Sony Announces Its 2016 TV Prices

And they're more affordable than you might think.

The Sony X930D. Pic: Sony
Sony

With the 4K world really starting to build up a head of steam now and the industry players finally getting at least close to agreeing what features they want from the 4K TV age, it seems inevitable that the next step in 4K’s quest to dominate the world’s living rooms will be price erosion. In fact, judging by the pricing Sony’s just announced for its 2016 TVs, it looks as if this ‘price war’ stage of 4K’s evolution is already starting.

Prices across Sony’s new TV range (which are listed in dollars and British pounds at the bottom of this article) are markedly affordable compared with the brand’s 2015 launch price structure, making 4K a more tantalisingly realistic possibility to many more households while also throwing down a challenging price gauntlet to Sony’s key TV rivals - none of whom have at the time of writing announced their own 2016 TV pricing plans.

New-found pragmatism

Sony’s bold pricing is perhaps also a reflection of the brand’s self-stated more pragmatic approach for this year, where it appears willing to sacrifice a few premium features to try and become more affordable. 

For instance, none of Sony’s 2016 TVs are equipped with the huge and brilliant built-in magnetic fluid speaker systems that have so distinguished some of Sony’s previous premium TVs (such as the 75X940C reviewed here). Also, I was rather surprised to find that Sony has only included a single direct LED TV - the flagship 75X940D - in its new range, despite this relatively expensive technology seemingly being better suited to the demands of the new High Dynamic Range picture format (explained here) that’s now joining 4K in the drive to take our TV viewing experience to a new level.

New features

Before I start sounding like I’m talking Sony’s new, more affordable TV range down too much, though, I should point out that the brand has introduced some interesting new TV features this year too. These include new processing for ‘upconverting’ non-HDR content to HDR and, on the X930D TVs, a new Slimline Backlight Drive technology that claims to deliver levels of local light control - even in central areas of the picture - that have previously been impossible with edge-lit LED screens.

All of Sony’s new TVs are now available for pre-order ahead of expected March shipping dates for most models, and I’ll be posting reviews of key sets from the new range in the coming weeks.

United States 4K Ultra HD Models

XBR-75X940D, 75 inches, direct LED with local dimming, $7,999.99 MSRP 

XBR-65X930D, 65 inches, edge LED with Slimline Backlight Drive, $4,999.99 MSRP

XBR-55X930D, 55 inches, edge LED with Slimline Backlight Drive, $3,299.99 MSRP

XBR-85X850D, 85 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, $9,999.99 MSRP

XBR-75X850D, 75 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, $4,999.99 MSRP

XBR-65X850D, 65 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, $3,499.99 MSRP

XBR-55X850D, 55 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, $2,499.99 MSRP

United States HD Models

48W650D, 48 inches, $699 

40W650D, 40 inches, $599

32W600D, 32 inches, $349

United Kingdom 4K Ultra HD Models

KD-75XD9405, 75 inches, direct LED with local dimming, £TBC

KD-64XD9305, 65 inches, edge LED with Slimline Backlight Drive, £2,800

KD-55XD9305, 55 inches, edge LED with Slimline Backlight Drive, £2,000

KD-75XD8505, 75 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, £4,000

KD-65XD8505, 65 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, £2,300

KD-55XD8505, 55 inches, edge LED with less sophisticated dimming, £1,500

United Kingdom HD Models

KDL-48WD65, 48 inches, £550

KDL-40WD65, 40 inches, £460

KDL-32WD60, 32 inches, £360

KDL-40RD45, 40 inches, £440

KDL-32RD43, 32 inches, £340