The 27 Best iPads of 2022

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The first iPad was unveiled by Steve Jobs on January 27, 2010, and in doing so Apple essentially created a new genre of handheld computer. There are now four different models of iPad to choose from - the iPad Pro, iPad Mini, iPad Air, or iPad line, each of which offers something a little different and fits perfectly into a particularly niche. An iPad Pro will offer more power and greater screen real-estate, while the Mini and the Air prioritize portability. The plain old iPad is an entry level device that is meant more as a general purpose tablet.

Falling somewhere between a laptop and an iPhone, iPads are extremely portable and can function as both when needed, with the help of accessories. The latest big screen iPad Pro is actually more powerful than many laptop computers, thanks to the Apple M1 chip inside it. With the latest version of iOS, they can even support a keyboard and mouse (or Apple's own Magic keyboard with a built in trackpad), blurring the line between tablet and computer even more.

Read on to see a comprehensive list of iPad models and generations.

iPad Air

4th Generation: Apple iPad Air (2020)

4.9
iPad Air 4

Amazon

The 4th generation iPad Air is the newest svelte tablet from Apple. Released in 2020, it builds on previous iterations with the now-classic edge-to-edge screen that minimizes the bezels. There's a top-mounted fingerprint sensor for easy unlock and a gorgeous 10.9-inch 2360x1640 resolution Liquid Retina IPS display.

Under the hood, there's a powerful new A14 bionic processor and you can pick from 64GB or 256GB of storage. The rear camera is a capable 12MP sensor that can record at 4K, while the front camera has a 7MP sensor. As with other newer iPad models, the Air 4 comes with USB-C for charging.

CPU: A14 Bionic | RAM: 4GB | Display: 2360x1640 | Models: Wi-Fi+ Cellular & GPS, Wi-Fi only | Storage: 64GB, 256GB

"The display looked great in most lighting conditions, including bright indoor light. The display was even visible outdoors on sunny days thanks to its sheer brightness." — Jeremy Laukkonen, Product Tester

Apple iPad Air 4

Jeremy Laukkonen / Lifewire

3rd Generation: Apple iPad Air (2019)

4.8
Apple iPad Air (2019)

Courtesy of Apple

The iPad Air (2019) sits halfway between the iPad and iPad mini 5 in terms of design and capability. It still has a traditional design with standard bezel and button placement; however, it has a sleeker build than previous generations and incorporates a faster A12 Bionic processor. Like the mini 5, it has a long-lasting battery and is highly portable.

An advantage that come with the Air is that it supports both the Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard, unlike the mini, which only works with the Pencil. However, while the Air does have True Tone adjustment for the display, it doesn't have ProMotion, which means that there will be more latency when using the Pencil compared to the iPad Pro.

Apple iPad Air (2019)

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CPU: A12 Bionic | RAM: 3GB | Display: 2224x1668 | Models: Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi+Cellular | Storage: 64GB, 256GB

"The new iPad Air incorporates hardware and features from both ends of Apple’s lineup by straddling the space between the affordable iPad and the premium iPad Pro." — Sandra Stafford, Product Tester

Apple iPad Air (2019)

Lifewire

2nd Generation: Apple iPad Air (2014)

Apple iPad Air 2

Courtesy of EBay

The iPad Air 2 marks a distinct departure for the iPad. Previous models always followed the iPhone, with a processor and features that were similar to the latest iPhone. The iPad Air 2 is powered by Apple's first triple-core processor, making it significantly faster than the iPhone 6. It also upgrades the internal memory used to run apps from 1 GB to 2 GB.

CPU: 1.5 GHz Tri-Core 64-bit Apple A8X w/Apple M8 Motion Co-Processor | RAM: 2 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

1st Generation: Apple iPad Air (2013)

Apple iPad Air

Courtesy of Ebay

The iPad Air's jump to a 64-bit processor was initially dismissed as more of a marketing ploy, but as the initial benchmarks were posted, it soon became apparent that the jump was worth it. The iPad Air is around twice as powerful as its predecessor, the iPad 4, and it has the same slim form factor as the iPad mini. 

CPU: 1.4 GHz Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A7 w/Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor | RAM: 1 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

iPad Mini

6th generation: Apple iPad Mini (2021)

Apple iPad Mini (2021).

Amazon

The newest iPad Mini has all the upgrades you'd expect in the latest entry in an established line of devices. It boosts performance significantly, both in processing and graphical power, so that it's up to the task of handling more demanding modern apps. However, the big change here is that Apple has finally given in and embraced the standard USB-C port found in all Android devices.

This makes it more widely compatible with non-apple products, though if you currently only use Apple devices it means carrying around different cables in addition to the lightning cable you use with your iPhone.

Other changes with this edition of the iPad Mini include support for the second generation Apple Pencil, a slightly larger screen, as well as Wi-Fi 6 and 5G compatibility. One other positive point to make about the 2021 iPad Mini is that much of its construction is now composed of recycled materials, making the device much more environmentally friendly.

CPU: A15 Bionic | RAM: 4GB | Display: 2266x1488 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi+Cellular | Storage: 64GB, 256GB

5th Generation: Apple iPad Mini (2019)

4.5
Apple iPad Mini (2019)

Amazon

The iPad mini is now in its 5th generation. Released in 2019 after a gap of four years, it scales up in performance from the previous generation's iPad mini. It still boasts a 7.9-inch Retina display for portability, but it has a higher resolution panel with 324 pixels per inch. It also has a powerful A12 Bionic processor and more RAM, giving it better capabilities when it comes to multitasking, games, and media consumption.

Even more impressive, the mini 5 incorporates some features you'll find on higher-end iPad models, like Apple Pencil support and the productivity features of the latest iPad OS updates. However, you still won't get Smart Keyboard compatibility, USB-C, or Face ID.

Apple iPad Mini (2019)

Lifewire

CPU: A12 Bionic | RAM: 3GB | Display: 2048x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi+Cellular | Storage: 64GB, 256GB

"Features like True Tone help adjust the screen’s color temperature to accommodate your surroundings, making it a handy replacement for an e-reader." — Sandra Stafford, Product Tester

Apple iPad Mini (2019)

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4th Generation: Apple iPad Mini (2015)

Apple iPad Mini 4 (Wi-Fi, 128GB) - Space Gray (Previous Model)

Amazon

The iPad mini 4 was announced during the unveiling of the iPad Pro. Apple didn't spend much time on the mini 4, but it is a significant improvement over the iPad mini 3. In fact, the mini 3 completely disappears from the Apple lineup, leaving only the mini 2 and the mini 4 as the smaller iPads for sale.  

The iPad mini 4 is essentially the same as the iPad Air 2, which provides quite a boost to the mini 3. This extra processing power also means the mini 4 should be compatible with all of the latest multitasking features in iOS.

CPU: 1.5 GHz Tri-Core 64-bit Apple A8X w/Apple M8 Motion Co-Processor | RAM: 2 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

3rd Generation: Apple iPad Mini (2014)

Apple iPad Mini 3rd Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The iPad mini 3 is essentially the same as the iPad mini 2 with a Touch ID fingerprint sensor tacked on. The Touch ID supports unlocking your iPad with your thumbprint, purchasing apps, and using the new Apple Pay.  ​

CPU: 1.4 GHz Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A7 w/Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor | RAM: 1 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

2nd Generation: Apple iPad Mini (2013)

Apple iPad Mini 2

Courtesy of Ebay

The first iPad mini was a bit underpowered, sharing the same processor and memory as the iPad 2. The second-generation mini not only jumped in price but also jumped in terms of power. Utilizing the same basic A7 processor used in the iPad Air, the mini 2 is only slightly less powerful. This makes it essentially an iPad Air for $100 off the price.

The iPad mini 2 is officially referred to as the "iPad mini with Retina display".

CPU: 1.4 GHz Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A7 w/Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor | RAM: 1 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

1st Generation: Apple iPad Mini (2012)

Apple iPad Mini 1st Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

With a 7.9-inch display, the original iPad mini was slightly larger than competing 7-inch tablets. It was powered by the same processor as the iPad 2, but it included many of the same features as the latest full-sized iPad, including 4G compatibility and superior dual-facing cameras. At $329 for the entry-level model, it was the cheapest iPad.

The original iPad mini and the second generation "iPad 2" were the two best-selling iPad models. 

CPU: 1 GHz Dual-Core ARM Cortex-A9 (Apple A5) | RAM: 512 MB | Display: 1024x768 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

iPad Pro

5th Generation: Apple iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2021)

4.9
Apple iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2021)

Best Buy

You'd be forgiven at first glance for mistaking the iPad Pro of 2021 for the iPad Pro of 2020. On the surface they are almost identical, but power it on and it will become crystal clear how much of an upgrade the 2021 iPad represents. Crystal clear is certainly the description that fits the stunning mini-LED display of the latest iPad Pro. Its high resolution and rich color and contrast reproduction are absolutely stunning.

Powering that big, beautiful display is the Apple M1 chip, which is the same processer you'll find in Apple's latest Macbook computers, albeit limited due to the strikingly thin form factor of the iPad Pro. It's also now possible to get a whopping 2 terabytes of built in storage, though that upgraded model may set you back as much as two grand.

CPU: Apple M1 | RAM: 8GB | Display: 11-inch (2388x1668) , 12.9-inch (2732x2048) | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi+Cellular | Storage: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB, 2TB

4th Generation: Apple iPad Pro 11-inch (2020)

Apple iPad Pro 11-inch (2020)

The iPad Pro released in 2020 comes in two sizes: an 11-inch slate, and a 12.9-inch slate. Both take their features and design cues from the third generation (2018) iPad Pro's, continuing to incorporate Apple Pencil support (now a second-generation Pencil), minimizing bezels to increase screen size and aspect ratio, and focusing on general productivity, art, and multitasking use cases.

To that end, you have the new, more powerful A12Z Bionic chip powering the Pros along with a 120Hz high refresh display. The screen is an IPS panel that's big and bright, making it easy and smooth to draw on. The latest iOS 13.4 update also comes with features to make using multiple apps at the same time easier, and improving productivity. An additional accessory that many will find useful is the Magic Keyboard, which includes the first trackpad designed for an iPad and a USB-C port. There's even a cursor now.

IPad Pro 11-Inch

 Lifewire

CPU: A12Z Bionic | RAM: 6GB | Display: 11-inch (2388x1668) , 12.9-inch (2732x2048) | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi+Cellular | Storage: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB

3rd Generation: Apple iPad Pro 11-Inch (2018)

4.9
iPad Pro 2018

Courtesy of Amazon

This smaller iPad Pro comes with all the bells and whistles as the 12.9-inch Pro model above, only with an 11-inch diagonal form factor. It has the same CPU, camera setup, and embedded M12 coprocessor. The smaller size leads to the only other difference (besides a $200-lower price point) between the two Pro models: the somewhat lower display resolution.

CPU: A12X Bionic chip with Neural Engine | RAM: 4 GB (1 TB model includes 6 GB) | Display: 2388x1668 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1TB

"We tried switching between the games in-play to more productivity-focused tasks like video editing or sketching and it still never faltered." — Jordan Oloman, Product Tester

Apple iPad Pro 11-Inch (2018)

Lifewire / Jordan Provost

3rd Generation: Apple iPad Pro 12.9-Inch (2018)

4.9
Apple 12.9-inch iPad Pro

Courtesy of Apple

The 2018 refresh of the largest iPad Pro adds the second-generation Apple Pencil, which connects to the side of the Pro and charges there. The usable screen is still 12.9-inches diagonally, but Apple has shrunk the overall enclosure with even smaller bezels than before. The new Pro also gets a boost in processing power, going from the Apple A10 Fusion chip to the A12X Bionic chip with Neural Engine, the same processor in Apple's flagship iPhones. The iPad Pro comes with a 12 MP camera with Smart HDR tech, and can shoot 4K video at 30 or 60 frames per second. The front camera is 7 MP and includes Apple's own Portrait mode and Lighting. Finally, Apple has switched out its standard Lightning cable for the more industry-standard USB-C.

CPU: A12X Bionic chip with Neural Engine | RAM: 4 GB (1 TB model includes 6 GB) | Display: 2732x2048 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1TB

2nd Generation: Apple iPad Pro 10.5-inch (2017)

.5-inch iPad Pro

Apple

The second-generation 9.7-inch iPad Pro isn't a 9.7-inch Pro at all. With a smaller bezel around the display, the newest iPad Pro extends the screen to 10.5 inches while only extending the length of the iPad by half an inch. This iPad matches 2017's 12.9-inch in power and performance while maintaining a smaller size and cheaper price.

CPU: 6-Core 64-bit Apple A10X Fusion | RAM: 4 GB | Display: 2734x2048 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB​

2nd Generation: Apple iPad Pro 12.9-Inch (2017)

Apple iPad Pro 12.9-Inch (2017)

Courtesy of Amazon

The second-generation iPad Pro adds the True Tone display that debuted in the 9.7-inch model to the bigger 12.9-inch model. This gives the world's best tablet compatibility with a theatrical wide color gambit, which will make movies and videos look fantastic. The new True Tone display also operates at 120 Hz to provide smoother graphical transitions and has a 12-megapixel back-facing camera.

CPU: 6-Core 64-bit Apple A10X Fusion | RAM: 4 GB | Display: 2734x2048 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB

1st Generation: Apple iPad Pro 9.7-Inch (2016)

Apple iPad Pro 1st Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

Apple's 9.7-inch iPad Pro is not simply a smaller version of the 12.9-inch Pro. It improves upon the display, adding True Tone and decreased reflection in bright light such as sunlight. It also sports a 12 MP camera that is compatible with Live Photos.

The 9.7-inch iPad Pro also works with Apple's new Smart Keyboard and the Apple Pencil, an advanced stylus for precise drawing.

CPU: Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A9X | RAM: 2 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 32 GB, 128 GB, 256 GB

1st Generation: Apple iPad Pro 12.9-Inch (2016)

Apple iPad Pro 1st Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The iPad Pro is a super-sized and super-charged iPad. The 12.9-inch display towers over the 9.7-inch iPad air, and it makes the 7.9-inch iPad mini look like an iPad Tiny. But the iPad Pro isn't just a bigger iPad. It includes Apple's latest A9X processor, which improves processing power by almost twice as much compared to the model in the iPad Air 2. This makes the iPad Pro as fast or faster than most laptops. The 12.9-inch Pro was also the first iPad to support the Smart Keyboard and Apple Pencil.

CPU: 2.26 GHz Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A9X | RAM: 4 GB | Display: 2734x2048 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 32 GB, 128 GB, 256 GB

iPad

9th Generation: Apple iPad (2021)

Apple iPad (2021).

Apple

The 2021 iPad offers some meaningful upgrades over its predecessor. Perhaps most significantly, this new iPad features a 12MP camera, which will take much better photos and video than the 2020 iPad with its 1.2MP camera. It's important if you plan to use your iPad for Zoom meetings.

Additionally, the 2021 iPad doubles the 2020 model's storage by offering 64GB and 256GB variants, as opposed to the comparatively meager 32GB and 128GB variants of the previous generation. The 2021 iPad also gets a new, more powerful processor.

CPU: A13 Bionic | RAM: 3GB | Display: 2160x1620 | Models: Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 64GB, 256GB

8th Generation: Apple iPad (2020)

4.4
iPad (8th Generation)

Apple

The 8th generation iPad beefs up everything from previous models. You continue to get a 10.2-inch Retina display that can hit 500 nits of brightness. The resolution is 2160x1620 with 264ppi. It's powered by an A12 Bionic processor and comes with 32GB and 128GB storage options. Like the previous model, it supports the Smart Keyboard and Apple Pencil for improved multitasking, multimedia, and productivity.

Apple iPad 10.2-inch (8th Generation)

Jeremy Laukkonen / Lifewire

CPU: A12 Bionic | RAM: 3GB | Display: 2160x1620 | Models: Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 32GB, 128GB

"Combined with iPadOS 14, which makes it easier and faster to flip between apps, the combination of the 8th gen iPad and a Smart Keyboard was a reasonable replacement for my laptop in a lot of situations." — Jeremy Laukkonen, Product Tester

7th Generation: Apple iPad (2019)

4.8
Apple iPad (2019)

Courtesy of Apple

Released in 2019, this iPad brings a larger 10.2-inch display to the table. The larger screen is still sharp at 2160x1620 and comes with 264ppi. Under the hood, it runs an Apple A10 Fusion processor, has 3GB of RAM, with 32GB, and 128GB storage options. It's a great option for productivity and multimedia because it offers full support for Smart Keyboard and the Apple Pencil. It also has new multitasking features with iPad OS and it supports external storage devices.

CPU:  A10 Fusion | RAM: 3GB | Display: 2160x1620 | Models: Wi-Fi + Cellular | Storage: 32GB, 128GB

"The larger screen gives you more space for multitasking and split-screen applications, and a better surface for Apple Pencil." — Ajay Kumar, Product Tester

Apple iPad 10.2-inch (7th Generation)

Lifewire / Jordan Provost

6th Generation: Apple iPad (2018)

iPad Wi-Fi 128GB - Space Gray (6th Generation)

Apple

The 2018 refresh of the iPad adds support for the Apple Pencil, an advanced stylus that works with special controls on the screen to provide enhanced precision. The entry-level iPad also gets a boost in processing power, going from the Apple A9 to the A10 Fusion, which is the same processor used in the iPhone 7 series. The 2018 iPad retains the price tag, with a slight discount for educational institutions. 

CPU: 2.34 Ghz Quad-Core 64-bit Apple A10 Fusion | RAM: 2 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G​ | Storage: 32 GB, 128 GB

5th Generation: Apple iPad (2017)

Apple iPad (2017)

Courtesy of Amazon

While the world expected an unveiling of a new iPad Pro and perhaps an iPad Air 3, Apple went conspicuously subtle, releasing a slight update to their iPad lineup in the way of the "iPad". The new 9.7-inch iPad may drop the Air name, but it's virtually an iPad Air 2 with a slightly faster processor. The new iPad Air doesn't have the Air 2's laminated screen and gains about half an inch in thickness, although you probably couldn't tell the difference unless comparing the two side-by-side. The best new feature: the $329 entry-level price tag.

CPU: 1.85 Ghz Dual-Core 64-bit Apple A9 | RAM: 2 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 32 GB, 128 GB

4th Generation: Apple iPad (2012, 4th Generation)

Apple iPad 4th Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The 4th generation iPad was a surprise release during the unveiling of the iPad mini. This generation of iPad had the same features as the iPad 3 but included a much more powerful processor. Debuting in early November, it also changed the release cycle of the iPad, which had previously seen its releases in March or April. The early release created some backlash among those who had recently purchased an iPad 3.

CPU: 1.4 GHz Dual-Core Apple Swift (Apple A6) | RAM: 1 GB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

3rd Generation: Apple iPad (2012, 3rd Generation)

Apple iPad 3rd Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The 3rd generation iPad dropped the numbering system in the official name, although releases were still referred to it using this numbering system in the press. The "new iPad" (as it was called during the announcement) included a 2056x1536 resolution Retina Display, making it the highest resolution display for a tablet at its release. It kept the same basic processor as the iPad 2 with an updated graphics chip to help power the new display. It was also the first iPad to offer 4G compatibility.

CPU: 1 GHz Dual-Core ARM Cortex-A9 (Apple A5X) | RAM: 512 MB | Display: 2056x1536 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 4G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

2nd Generation: Apple iPad (2011)

Apple iPad 2nd Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The iPad 2 added dual-facing cameras to the iPad, allowing users to snap photos and capture movies, and added video conferencing capabilities. The second-generation iPad doubled the processing speed, and with games becoming more popular on the iPad, it included a much more powerful graphics processor. The iPad 2 was 33 percent thinner and 15 percent lighter than its predecessor. It also gained a gyroscope, making its basic features equal to the iPhone except for voice calling.

CPU: 1 GHz Dual-Core ARM Cortex-A9 (Apple A5) | RAM: 512 MB | Display: 1024x768 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 3G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

1st Generation: Apple iPad (2010)

Apple iPad 1st Generation

Courtesy of Ebay

The original iPad was released on April 3, 2010. It included many of the same features as the iPhone and iPod Touch, including the 3-axis accelerometer that enables the device to detect when it is being moved or tilted. The iPad was powered by the same operating system as the iPhone, allowing it to run the same apps in compatibility mode. It also had unique user interface elements that made use of the larger screen. The day before its official release, Netflix announced it would be supporting the tablet with a streaming app built from the ground up for the iPad.

The original iPad still has some uses, but no longer supports operating system updates. Many apps do not support the first iPad.

CPU: 1 GHz ARM Cortex-A8 (Apple A4) | RAM: 256 MB | Display: 1024x768 | Models: Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 3G | Storage: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

About Our Trusted Experts

Andy Zahn has been writing for Lifewire since 2019 and has experience reviewing a wide variety of electronics from tablets to gaming PCs.

Daniel Nations has over 20 years of experience in the computer industry. He specializes in Apple products, including the iPad.

Ajay Kumar joined Dotdash in November 2018 and brings with him nearly a decade of experience in tech journalism and digital publishing. He is an expert in consumer electronics, including Apple's iPad.

Jeremy Laukkonen is a tech writer and the creator of a popular blog and video game startup. He specializes in consumer technology, including tablets like the iPad.

Jordan Oloman is a Newcastle-based tech writer whose work has appeared in PC Gamer, TechRadar, Eurogamer, IGN, and GamesRadar. His areas of expertise include Apple's iPhone, iPad, and iPod.

Sandra Stafford is a writer who specializes in tech and writes about all sorts of gadgets, including the Apple iPad. She praised the iPad mini as a great replacement for an e-reader.

FAQ
  • How much is an iPad?

    The price of an iPad can vary fairly widely, and each one can meet different needs and budgets. If you're looking for a basic multimedia and browsing slate, with the option for some mild productivity uses, the basic 64GB iPad with just Wi-Fi will cost you a mere $329. It's a great option for students, in particular. On the most costly end, the 12.9-inch iPad Pro starts at $999 for the base 128GB Wi-Fi model, but you can make it as expensive as a laptop if you load it up with extra storage and cellular connectivity. The Pro series is more geared toward productivity, with the compact iPad mini and iPad Air falling in the middle ground of these two extremes, offering a mix of multimedia and productivity.

  • What are the alternatives to an iPad?

    Apple isn't the only company to make tablets, Lifewire contributor Jason Schneider reviewed the Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+ last year and gave it high marks for its large, beautiful screen and included stylus. Microsoft's line of tablets is also very well thought of. Our roundup of all the tablets we've tested should give you an idea of how the best tablets from a variety of brands compare.

  • Are iPads good for photography?

    An iPad isn't exactly the best tool for capturing photos. They're equipped with cameras similar to what you'd find in an iPhone, so they do a decent job of it in a pinch. They are also great for video conferencing due to their large screens.


    It's also worth noting that photographers often find iPads to be excellent tools for processing images captured on a DSLR or mirrorless camera while they're on the road. I'd personally recommend Adobe Lightroom Mobile as the ideal app for on-the-go iPad image processing.

Apple iPad Mini (2019)

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What to Look For in an iPad

Display

One of the advantages of buying an iPad is that you can be sure that within the time they were released they are certain to have one of the best screens among comparable tablets. The top end iPad Pro, of course, has the best display, but even a base model iPad screen looks great.

Storage

A possible disadvantage of iPads is the lack of any convenient form of expandable storage. There's no microSD card slot, and even the newer models, which start with 64GB of internal storage, are probably going to fill up faster than you think. If you know you're going to want to store a lot of data on your iPad it's probably worth springing for the upgraded models with extra storage.

Apple iPad Air (2019)

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Processor

If you're buying the latest iPad, you really need not concern yourself too much with the processor (also known as the CPU). This is the part of the iPad that determines how many applications you can run, and how well those applications will be able to run. The processor in a new iPad will be able to handle everything you can throw at it for a good few years. However, it's a much more important consideration if you're thinking of buying an older used iPad. An older iPad means an older, slower processor that might struggle to keep up with modern applications.

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