Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves Review

Lethmik’s touch screen offering stumbles in almost every key area

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Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves

Lifewire / Jordan Oloman 

What We Like
  • Warm and cozy

  • Dirt cheap price tag

  • Handy plastic bag to keep your mitts dry

What We Don't Like
  • Lackluster form factor and design

  • Precarious gaps in grip

  • Sensitivity limited to two fingers

Lethmik’s gloves are a truly budget option in the touchscreen gloves market. The low price means significant durability and sensitivity issues.

3

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves

Lifewire / Jordan Oloman 

We all need to keep our hands warm in the colder months, but we still want to be capable of using our touchscreen devices. Gloves you can also use with smartphones have therefore ballooned in popularity in recent years, resulting in numerous iterations on the formula.

One such company attempting to corner the market is Lethmik, whose Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves you may well have stumbled upon if you’ve been looking for a pair yourself while on a budget. Read on for my in-depth review of these winter warmers to see if they hold up against the stiff competition despite their low price tag.

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves
Lifewire / Jordan Oloman  

Design: Old school design, but not very professional 

Lethmik’s touchscreen gloves have a very old-school design, made entirely out of wool outside of the silicone grips. It’s a simple fabric, and as a result, you can only swipe your screen using the tip of your thumb and forefinger. This means that you don’t get sensitivity across all devices or with your entire hand while you’re wearing them. The fabric makes the gloves very comfortable but sadly quite thin. However, the wool at the cuff did keep my wrists warm and locked off from wind and snow.

You can only swipe your screen using the tip of your thumb and forefinger.

The gloves arrived in a zip-sealed bag with a plastic front. There’s not much information about the product available on the packaging, but I was happy to have the plastic bag to store the gloves when they got wet—which is useful given that these gloves are lined with wool instead of acrylic or leather.

Instead of all-over dots—that similar products have—these gloves have strips of silicone with big gaps in between. This means holding your device at certain angles can be slippery and precarious.

One of my main issues with the gloves is that they don’t look very professional. They have patchy silicone and the grey nubs on the thumb and forefinger, clearly designating that they're touchscreen gloves. If you’re looking for something you can wear in a business environment, you should look into leather gloves or more reserved acrylic designs.

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves
Lifewire / Jordan Oloman 

Comfort: A very gendered size, but warm and cozy 

The Lethmik gloves are available in men or women’s size rather than your typical size brackets. The men’s size, fortunately, fit my hands well, but it’s not a very useful sizing mechanism for people with very large or very small hands. Luckily, they have great elasticity and contoured very well to my hands, gripping tightly to my fingers which is important for efficient text-typing. 

Slipping the gloves on, I didn't feel much fabric or lining between my fingers and the device I was touching, which is an issue. If you plan on using these gloves in the snow or heavy rain, they’re not going to hold up well. Trying to use your phone through gloves is already difficult without the complications of inclement weather.

Despite the above, the material is incredibly warm and cozy, even more so than other fur-lined gloves that I tested. By sacrificing the overall sensitivity, the Lethmik team has actually made their gloves extremely comfortable.

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves
Lifewire / Jordan Oloman 

Durability: Not long-lasting

The wool lining harms the durability of Lethmik’s touchscreen gloves. Even after a few uses over a couple of days, I found that threads were coming loose and the fabric was starting to fray, both in between the fingers and at the tips.

Aside from the general woolly worries, the rest of the gloves are actually constructed well. I saw no potential for wear and tear with the silicone and the cuff felt sturdy, though the wool material did attract a lot of hair and dust (pet owners beware).

I found that threads were coming loose and the fabric was starting to fray, both in between the fingers and at the tips.

Touch Sensitivity: Very limited

By honing in on specific areas (two specific finger nubs), you would think that Lethmik would succeed in the sensitivity department, but it turns out they’re far worse than other designs. Lethmik’s touchscreen offering is usable while doing minor formatting and typing, but you have to get used to pressing down with some force to ensure it registers the tap—and even then it’s inaccurate. Also, it does make things difficult when there are only two touchpoints and you’re holding multiple items that need to use one of your non-dominant fingers.

Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves
Lifewire / Jordan Oloman 

The precision is passable on a phone, but on a tablet or another device with a large screen, it really starts to become a problem. This is especially true when you have to use other fingers to grip the device, it can get quite tricky to manage more in-depth tasks. 

To check the true touchscreen capabilities of Lethmik’s offering, I decided to conduct a small test across the range of gloves I’ve been reviewing. I timed how long it took to open my phone, navigate to Twitter, and save a draft tweet of the sentence “I’m typing this using touchscreen gloves.” Wearing Lethmik’s gloves, I managed this task in 58 seconds, which is a poor score when compared to the competition.

The precision is passable on a phone, but on a tablet or another device with a large screen, it really starts to become a problem.

Price: Incredibly cheap 

At less than $10 on Amazon, these gloves are incredibly inexpensive. If you don’t want to spend very much and just need a pair of hand warmers that work with your phone, you can’t really grumble at the efficiency of Lethmik’s gloves. They do the job but aren’t going to support you in the long run when compared to the competition. Like the old adage goes, "If you buy cheap, you pay twice." I could see these gloves failing in the durability department if you’re not already put off by the unprofessional design and lack of sensitivity.

Competition: Very affordable, higher-quality options available 

Lethmik’s touchscreen gloves are hard to compare to the competition because of how much cheaper they are. Given that we can have touchscreen leather gloves like Harrms luxury offering, it feels like a step down to go settle for wool, especially when you can only affect the screen with your forefinger and thumb. 

The best option we tested is the Agloves Polar Sport Touchscreen Gloves, which, at sub $20 have great sensitivity and comfort as well as a sleek design that does not look budget. If you suddenly decide you want to go all out you could pick up Mujjo’s gloves, but the jump in price would certainly be too much of a leap for the feature set.

Final Verdict

A classic case of getting what you pay for. 

The Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves are cheap enough to serve as a passable set of gloves for the winter. That said, they have enough design flaws and issues with sensitivity that they’re hard to recommend for long-term use. They certainly work, with the caveat that you may not get much more than a single winter worth of use out of them.

Specs

  • Product Name Lethmik Non-Slip Touchscreen Gloves
  • Product Brand Lethmik
  • MPN KG17U02
  • Price $8.95
  • Release Date August 2017
  • Product Dimensions 8.9 x 5.2 x 0.8 in.