Is YouTube TV Down ... Or Is It Just You?

How to tell if YouTube TV is really down, or if it's on your end

Even if it seems like YouTube TV is down across the board, there's a decent chance the problem is on your end—perhaps due to a bad internet connection, a local network problem, or a faulty device. In rare cases, the fault may lie with your internet service provider (ISP).

Since it can be difficult to determine the reason why YouTube TV isn't working, we've compiled some tips and tricks to help you get the service back up and running.

Before continuing, you should be sure that the problem is with YouTube TV and not YouTube.

Is YouTube TV Down for Everyone or Just You?

The first step is to determine whether or not the problem is limited to your system. When the problem is on YouTube's end, all you can do is report the issue and wait for a fix. If you have already confirmed that you are the only one with the problem, skip to the next section for additional troubleshooting tips.

Here's how to diagnose the extent of the problem:

  1. Check the G Suite Status Dashboard. This site shows the current status of a variety of Google services.

    A screenshot of the G-Suite Status Dashboard showing Google service interruptions.

    It does not include YouTube or YouTube TV, but if a lot of Google services are down, then there's a good chance a service problem is affecting YouTube as well.

  2. Search Twitter. When a service like YouTube TV goes down, a lot of viewers turn to social media to vent and look for help.

    Twitter.

    The best place to look for this type of activity is on Twitter, where you will find complaints about YouTube TV outages under #YouTubeTVDown or similar hashtags and search terms.

    You can also check other social media platforms, but Twitter is the fastest resource for this kind of information. If YouTube TV is down, you can expect to find people complaining about it on Twitter.

    If the hashtag isn't useful, check out the TeamYouTube Twitter account.

  3. Check third-party sites. Some websites track the service status of websites and streaming platforms. You can use these sources to monitor network service problems. Here are a few:

If none of those steps reveals any evidence of service interruptions, then the problem is likely on your end.

How to Fix It When YouTube TV Isn't Working

Most problems that prevent YouTube TV from working are related to your network hardware and software. In rare cases, you may be dealing with some type of malware, or a problem with your internet service provider (ISP).

If you suspect that YouTube TV is only down for you, follow these troubleshooting tips to get it working again:

  1. Check the YouTube TV app. Sometimes the YouTube TV website goes down while the app continues to work properly.

    If you are watching YouTube TV on a web browser, download the YouTube TV app (iOS, Android, Windows) and try watching on your mobile device. If the app is working, then chances are the website is temporarily down.

  2. Restart or shut down your web browser.

    Wait at least 30 seconds before re-opening the browser, then try again.

  3. Use a different browser.

    If you can run YouTube TV using a different web browser, then that means there's a problem with your original browser.

  4. Clear your browser cache. Clearing the cache can prevent sites from using old forms and allow applications to run more smoothly.

  5. Clear your browser cookies.

    Clearing cookies can have undesirable effects, such as removing customization settings and login data.

  6. Restart your computer. Shutting down and restarting your computer can fix a variety of problems.

    If your computer is not shut down on a regular basis, then it is more likely to cause problems.

  7. Scan your computer for malware. Malware often targets users' browsing behavior, preventing them from accessing certain websites.

    If your device is infected with malware and it is successfully removed, then you may find your access to YouTube TV restored.

  8. Restart your modem and router.

    This is not likely to help if YouTube TV is the only website that is not working. It is more likely to help if you are having trouble accessing a variety of sites and services, in which case it will typically fix the problem.

  9. Verify you're using the real YouTube TV website. One method hackers use to steal private information is to use fake websites that look like real websites. This is called phishing. It can happen when someone provides you with a link to a fake version of a website.

    While this isn't very likely, it is easy to check. In your web browser, navigate to tv.youtube.com. If YouTube TV now works, you need not take any further action to fix the problem.

    If you arrived at the fake version of YouTube TV after clicking a suspicious link in an email, you should change your account password. You should also enable two-factor authentication to further secure access to your account.

Network Problems

If you've tried all of these troubleshooting tips and YouTube TV still isn't working, then you may be having a problem with your internet service provider. This is especially likely if other websites are also down. You may also have too many devices connected to your network, or you may have insufficient bandwidth to run high-data sites like YouTube TV.

If you aren't able to access YouTube TV through any of the devices on your network, and none of our tips worked, then you should contact your ISP for further assistance.

Last Resort: Change Your DNS Servers

There is a very small chance that YouTube TV is not working because the path your device is using to connect to Google's servers is wrong. This is likely true if you can use the service when connected to cellular data, but not when connected to your home internet. The easiest way to fix a problem like that is to use a different DNS server. If you aren't sure what a DNS server is, you're probably using the ones that your ISP assigned to you. Take a look at our guide to changing DNS servers for next steps, or check out our list of Free & Public DNS Servers for alternatives.