Humorous and Clever Intranet Names

Intranet names tied to deeper goals of community and team spirit

Server room
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Intranet users hold the key to sharing knowledge.

Mounds of employee information, corporate policies, and product inventories—among many data sources stored on servers or in cloud services—are meaningless without the motivation to share and use the information. 

One way to make intranets appealing, as organizations are discovering, is to design them as the go-to place using humorous and clever intranet names and themes. The intranet names are customized for a company and carefully designed much like you would name a website. But, take a step further and you can have fun with it. 

Names that company intranets are adopting have a lot more meaning than meets the eye. The intranet names are tied to deeper goals that unlock sharing through community and team spirit.

An intranet is a network that's designed to not directly interface with the internet. Many companies and organizations run private intranets to store files, share news, and run web apps.

Homer

Dan Connolly, enterprise sales director at ​Interact Intranet Ltd., says their company’s own intranet is named Homer, after the cartoon character Homer Simpson of the television series The Simpsons. “Homer has a user profile and loves donuts," says Connolly, “and that ties in nicely for us, using donuts for gamification as rewards.” 

Pitstop

Serving as a model for Interact’s customers who slant their intranet sites to their business, the Pitstop has been named for the company intranet at Macrae & Dick, a new and used car dealer group in Scotland. The company has been in business since 1878, and even the contemporary intranet signals change in the way information is shared.

Wikidelia

Fidelia, an insurance assistance company represented in the Covea Group based in Paris, serves more than 1,100 employees on their intranet named Wikidelia (rhymes with Fidelia). Built on the ​XWiki SAS product, the intranet is a new paradigm for a document repository. Wikidelia has become a written culture for Fidelia that now relies on business procedures and knowledge resources for employees to readily find answers.

TechWatch

EADS Innovation Works—now rebranded as Airbus Group—runs TechWatch. This collaborative intranet, also a product of XWiki, is used for TechWatch researchers to disseminate strategic information in real time.

Huluverse

Hulu, the subscription service for streaming video named their intranet, Huluverse. ​Igloo Software, the company that runs Hulu’s intranet, says their employees are called Hulugans.

Club of Love

The Club of Love is an intranet creation of middle-school students at Robert Frost Middle School in Rockville, Maryland. "The Club of Love is derived from the idea of idea of spreading love in the community," says Pankaj Taneja, marketing manager for ​​​HyperOffice, the software that the intranet is built on. The students share information, like pictures and documents, chat, and email, and organize community projects to earn credits for student services learning.

Dwight

In Tuscon, Arizona, PIMA Federal Credit Union’s intranet named Dwight spins a contemporary theme. It's named after Dwight Schrute, the know-it-all character on NBC’s The Office. As Maz Mohammadi, sales engineer for Intranet Connections says, “The client wanted their intranet to be the 'know-it-all' place for employees.” 

MILO

Intranets don’t necessarily have to take a persona. In fact, Karleen Murphy—who monitors customer sites for Intranet Connections—shared some names in use on their client intranets, including MILO, which is an acronym for "mountains of information logically organized." 

Fetch

Also from Intranet Connections, Fetch is one of our favorite intranet names and is currently in use at the San Diego Humane Society, says Murphy. 

Glove Box

The Bob Moore Auto Group of Oklahoma named their intranet Glove Box, because the name represents a car-related place to find vital information. It's built on the Intranet Connections platform.