HP Pavilion 590-p0025z Review

Under a dull design, the Pavillion boasts an impressive array of specs

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3.3

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z

Lifewire / Gannon Burgett

What We Like

  • Nice array of ports on the front of the PC

  • Quick and easy setup

  • Solid performance for day-to-day use

  • Easy to upgrade

What We Don't Like

  • Loud under heavy loads

  • Bland design

The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z is a basic PC that gets the job done. It’s not going to wow anyone in either design or performance, but it’s a great mid-range option for basic computer needs.

3.3

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z

Lifewire / Gannon Burgett

Hewlett-Packard, more commonly known as HP, has been a predominant brand in the home computer world for quite some time. The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z is one of its mainstays, a budget-friendly desktop computer that packs nearly everything you could ask for in a basic family computer. Most impressive, it does all this without sacrificing standard performance needs. We’ve put the PC to the test, from boot up to benchmarks. Read on to see how it fared as a home workstation.

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z
Lifewire / Gannon Burgett

Design: Bland doesn’t have to be bad

As you might expect from a basic desktop computer, the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z features a bland design. The front has a silver plastic cover with a brushed-metal aesthetic, while the remainder of the case is made of black powder-coated metal. On the front of the desktop is the metallic HP logo. You’ll also find a flush DVD drive and a number of ports including a headphone jack, an SD card reader, two USB 3.0 ports, and a single USB Type-C port. The side panels feature ventilation while the back offers additional USB and display ports.

The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z is one of its mainstays, a budget-friendly desktop computer that packs nearly everything you could ask for in a basic family computer.

The case itself feels a bit on the budget side, but that shouldn’t come as a surprise considering the Pavilion brand has always been for budget-friendly computers. To access the internals, you’ll need a screwdriver to remove a single screw and open the side panel of the case. We would’ve liked to see tool-less opening to make things easier for those times when you want to upgrade RAM or add an extra HDD, but again, this computer isn’t made with gamers and tinkerers in mind. All things considered, a single screw isn’t too bad in the realm of things.

Overall, the design isn’t anything special, but it isn’t meant to be. For a majority of users, this computer will get set up and plugged in, with minimal additional tinkering.

Setup Process: Straight to the point

Setting up the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z is straightforward. After we plugged in the power cable, keyboard, mouse, and a monitor of our choice, we were ready to start the Windows 10 setup process. From the time we turned on the computer until the time we were ready to start browsing and installing the benchmark software, it was a matter of 15-20 minutes. The process is guided, making it simple even for people who aren’t the most technically savvy.

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z
Lifewire / Gannon Burgett

Performance: Slow and steady wins this race

Our particular model of the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z had an AMD Ryzen 5 2400G 4-Core processor and AMD Radeon RX 550 (2 GB GDDR5 dedicated) graphics card alongside 8GB of RAM and a 1TB HDD.

Throughout our testing, the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z had a boot up time of roughly 25 seconds, give or take a few. Once booted up, applications opened up without much issue, but there was certainly a noticeable difference in speed compared to computers that use solid state drives (SSDs) over hard disk drives. Adobe Photoshop took a good 15-20 seconds to open on average, while Microsoft Word and other Microsoft Office applications took around 10 seconds or so.

Moving onto the CPU and GPU benchmarks, the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z performed more or less on par with what its specifications are designed for. We tested the computer with Geekbench, PCMark, and Cinebench to see just how well it stacked up in just about every department imaginable.

All in all, the computer is more than powerful enough for your basic computer tasks, and even more.

In the Geekbench tests, which measures CPU performance, the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z scored 6,739 on the single core test and 18,022 on the multi-core test. This falls in line with other computers with the same internals. In the PCMark test, the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z scored 4,783 overall with an 8,294 in Essentials, 5,352 in Productivity, and 4,592 in Digital Content Creation. Finally, the Cinebench test, which measures rendering performance for 3D content creation, showed the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z maxed out at 112.34 fps on the OpenGL test and 824 cb in the CPU test.

All in all, the computer is more than powerful enough for your basic computer tasks, and even more. Photoshop should run fine so long as you're not working with gigabytes upon gigabytes in files. Even decent gaming is possible, if you don't mind slightly slower frame rates and turning down settings. It's a great do-it-all option that has enough power to stay future-proof for a number of years. If the need does arise to upgrade something, it's easy enough to access the internals and upgrade the tower with a more powerful GPU, additional RAM or an SSD.

Network: Slow and steady wins this race

The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z features both wired and wireless networking. On the wired front, it features an integrated 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet LAN connection. On the wireless front, it has a 802.11a/b/g/n/ac wireless network adapter with Bluetooth 4.2 to boot.

When testing both the wireless and wired networking options, the computer kept steady speeds with no noticeable interference, regardless of if the computer was next to our router or a few rooms over. Of course, the wired connection proved a bit more consistent in terms of speed, but overall performance was nearly the same across the board, whether we were simply browsing the web or playing more resource-intensive games.

HP Pavilion 590-p0025z
Lifewire / Gannon Burgett

Software:

The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z runs Windows 10 Home (64-bit). There’s no specialized software for the computer or anything to configure, aside from the usual Windows setup, so it’s fairly straightforward. HP has some software installed by default, but you can uninstall it without too much issue.

If the need does arise to upgrade something, it's easy enough to access the internals and upgrade the tower with a more powerful GPU, additional RAM or an SSD.

Price: Right down the middle

The HP Pavilion 590-p0025z has an MSRP of $679.99. This makes it the second least-expensive option in HP’s Pavilion line-up, on par with other budget-friendly desktop computers. This model of the Pavillion falls between low-end and mid-range desktop computers from other manufacturers based on its performance. Overall, the price seems adequate for the specifications you’re getting with the computer.

Competition: One and the same

Being a fairly standard desktop computer, there’s plenty of competition out there for the HP Pavilion 590-p0025z. That said, we’ve narrowed it down to two options that we believe fit in a similar niche as our model: the HP Envy Desktop PC with Intel Core i5-8400 and the Dell Inspiron PC with Intel Core i5-7400.

First up is the Dell Inspiron PC with Intel Core i5-8400. At $599.99, this desktop computer features the understated design Dell has used for many generations in its Inspiron lineup of desktop computers. Behind the glossy black faceplate is an 8th generation Intel Core i5-8400 processor, an Intel UHD Graphics 630 GPU, 8GB of RAM, and a 1TB HDD. It features nearly identical specs to our HP Pavilion 590-p0025z computer, but comes in nearly $100 cheaper, which could make for an enticing option.

Next up is the HP Envy Desktop PC with Intel Core i5-8400. It retails for $839.99 and features a nearly identical design with a slightly different front plate. Like our HP Pavilion, it features a plethora of ports on the front, including a USB-C port and an SD card slot, as well as a DVD optical drive.

Inside, it features an 8th generation Intel Core i5-8400, Intel UHD Graphics 630 GPU, 12GB of RAM, and both a 256GB SSD as well as a 1TB HDD. That extra bit of RAM and the addition of the SSD to this desktop makes it an enticing choice over our HP Pavilion 590-p0025z. That said, it’s also possible to update the hardware yourself for less than what HP is asking for with its higher-end model.

Final Verdict

Plenty of power, but output is lacking.

Overall, we thought the HP Pavillion 590-p0025z performed admirably as a mid-range workstation for homes and offices. It won’t be kicking out the latest first-person shooter at 60 fps on a 4K monitor, but for basic video/audio editing, media viewing, and Microsoft Office tasks, it’ll get the job done without any fuss.

Specs

  • Product Name HP Pavilion 590-p0025z
  • Product Brand HP
  • UPC 192545069038
  • Price $679.99
  • Weight 11.35 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 6.69 x 10.9 x 13.3 in.
  • GPU AMD Radeon™ RX 550 Graphics (2 GB GDDR5 dedicated)
  • CPU AMD Ryzen™ 5 2400G 4-Core processor
  • Platform Windows 10 Home
  • Warranty 1 year limited hardware warranty
  • RAM 8GB
  • Storage 1TB HDD
  • Connections Front: One headphone/microphone combo, one USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 1, two USB 3.1 Gen 2 Rear: Two USB 2.0; Four USB 3.1 Gen 1
  • What’s in the box HP Pavilion 590-p0025z tower, wired HP mouse, wired HP keyboard, power cable, quick start guide, safety and warranty guide
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