All About Google News

Google News

Two businessmen sitting on bench
Two businessmen sitting on bench. Credit: Village Production

Google News is a custom internet newspaper with articles from 4,500 different news sources and all the search functions of Google.

Google News has undergone many changes over the years, but overall functions remain essentially the same regardless of updates. For example, in 2018, Google added a variety of artificial intelligence updates designed to include cool features such as newscasts and fun elements from other Google-owned properties, such as YouTube and Newsstand.

The core of Google News remains the same, however, regardless of the endless updates deployed. For example:

  1. Not every website is a "news" website, so Google News and the search box restrict your search to only items Google classifies as "news." 
  2. Top Stories are listed towards the top of the page, or above the fold in newspaper terms. Scrolling down reveals more news categories, such as World, US, Business, Entertainment, Sports, Health, Technology and Science. Many of these suggestions are based on assumptions Google is making about news items that would interest you, but you can personalize your experience, too.
  3. A grouping of the main news sections is in the left navigation pane. To get to a particular type of news quickly, simply click on a news grouping that interests you.
  4. A variety of news section comprise the right-hand navigation pane. You might see sections such as In The News, Recent, Fact Check, Editor's Picks, Sports, etc.
  5. Across the top of the page are four buttons: Headlines, Local, For You and your country. Selecting a button gives you a choice of options. Headlines provides news from anywhere in the world, Local offers news stories in your actual location, and For You offers stories based upon your specific interests.
    Screenshot of Google news home page.
    Screenshot of Google News page.

    Dateline

    In the image above, note how Google News shows the news source and the date it was published. (e.g. "Reuters 1 hour ago") This lets you find the freshest news article. It's particularly helpful to watch for this dateline with breaking stories.  

    Summaries

    Just as a newspaper offers part of a news article on the front page and then directs you to an interior page, Google News items only provide the first paragraph or so of a news item. To read more, you must click on the headline, which will direct you to the story's source. Some news items also have a thumbnail image.

    Clustering

    Google News clusters similar articles, as seen in the image below. Often many newspapers will republish the same article from the Associated Press or they'll write a similar article based on someone else's article. Related stories are often grouped near an example story. For example, an article about a high profile celebrity wedding would be grouped with similar articles. That way you could find your preferred news source. 

    Screenshot of Google News clustered articles.
    Clustering, or lumping similar articles together, is a standard Google News tactic.

    Customize Google News

    You can customize your Google News experience in several ways.

    • Change country localization by clicking the down arrow next to the country noted at the top of the page. Scroll down to select a new country.
    • Create new sections or reorder the way your news page looks by selecting Manage sections in the bottom of the left-hand navigation pane. For example, you could create a news section called "educational technology," and you could specify that you would like Google News to find fewer articles from ESPN and more from CNN. 
    • See more Editor's Picks by clicking the double arrow at the top of that section in the right-hand navigation pane. As you click that double arrow, the box will preview more picks from a variety of selected publications.
    • Add more of your specific interests to your newsfeed through the Manage sections area, too. Click Your interests, then enter the topics you want to see.

    Go to news.google.com to get started.