Facebook Pages Admin Roles Explained

The difference between admins, editors, moderators, analysts and advertisers

Screenshot of a Facebook admin page

Lifewire.

When you create a Facebook page, you're automatically assigned the role of admin as the owner of the page. If you have other people who are working with you or collaborating with you on your page, however, you can also assign them an admin role or a different role.

The Five Types of Facebook Page Roles

There are currently five types of roles that can be assigned to people working with Facebook pages. They include:

  • Admin: The role with the most authority and control.
  • Editor: The second most authoritative role. Editors can do everything admins can except manage other page roles and settings.
  • Moderator: This role is primarily for managing people, comments, messages and ads.
  • Advertiser: This role only has access to ad creation features and insights.
  • Analyst: This role have access to everything that advertisers do, such as insights and page quality, but they can't create ads.

Why You Should Use Facebook Admin Roles

Designating admin roles will create pros and cons in any situation, but if used well, it should be a positive thing for almost business, organization or brand. Having different individuals work as different roles can help you optimize your Facebook page and overall brand or marketing strategy.

Of course, one person might be very skilled at most all of the options, but having to focus on everything takes away from the level of quality your organization could reach. Instead, assigning several people come on as editors, moderators, advertisers and analysts can help relieve the workload and let those who may specialize in those types of areas take over while you focus on the “meat and potatoes” of the page.

Where to Find and Assign Facebook Page Roles

If you're an admin of a Facebook page, you can assign page roles to other Facebook users. From your Facebook page, select Settings in the top right followed by Page Roles in the left vertical menu.

Under Assign a New Page Role, type the name or email address of the person you want to assign a role to in the given field. Then use the dropdown list to the right to select the appropriate role. Select Add when you're done.

A screenshot of Facebook.com.

The people you've assigned roles to will appear under Existing Page Roles at the bottom of the page. Select the Edit button beside anyone to change their role or remove their role.

What Facebook Page Admins Can Do

The admin of a Facebook page has the most power, with the ability to add and edit permissions and admins at will, editing the page and adding/taking away apps, creating posts, moderating, commenting and deleting comments, sending messages as the page, creating ads, and viewing all insights.

Admins can also overview all of the activity of the other admins, removing or tweaking anything they find inappropriate or in need of a quick change. This gives a sense of legitimacy and order to Facebook pages as an actual, legitimate business tool, which had been previously lacking.

In summary, admins can:

  • manage roles and settings;
  • edit the page and its apps;
  • create and delete posts on behalf of the page;
  • send messages on behalf of the page;
  • respond to and delete both comments and posts;
  • remove and/or ban users;
  • create ads, promotions and boosted posts;
  • view page insights and page quality;
  • see which users published as the page; and
  • publish and manage jobs.

What Facebook Page Editors Can Do

Editors can do everything except change the admin settings. This means that businesses can put their Facebook pages into the hands of a trusted employee without having to worry about any major page roles or settings being changed.

It gives the chosen person or people as editors to really craft the voice of the page, create and curate the content, and really personify your brand or organization on Facebook. They're essentially given the freedom and opportunity to edit the content of the page as they see fit.

Editors can:

  • edit the page and its apps;
  • create and delete posts on behalf of the page;
  • send messages on behalf of the page;
  • respond to and delete both comments and posts;
  • remove and/or ban users;
  • create ads, promotions and boosted posts;
  • view page insights and page quality;
  • see which users published as the page; and
  • publish and manage jobs.

What Facebook Page Moderators Can Do

The moderator of a Facebook page is a lot like a community manager. Their primary role is to manage posts to the page as well as comments from fans and the general public.

It’s typically the editor’s job to keep conversation flowing with the fans so that they feel heard. Having someone who’s role is exclusively to maintain on-brand postings and keep the flow of conversation up while you attend to your other duties can be a huge help.

Editors engage with fans/followers rather than post edit page content. They also go through all of the fan feedback and find anything inappropriate (by your organization’s standards), negative, or just improperly advertised and remove it from the page.

Moderators are permitted to:

  • send messages on behalf of the page;
  • respond to and delete both comments and posts;
  • remove and/or ban users;
  • create ads, promotions and boosted posts;
  • view page insights and page quality;
  • see which users published as the page; and
  • publish and manage jobs.

What Facebook Page Advertisers Can Do

The advertiser role is focused solely on creating ads and viewing insights to help in the creation and implementation. They can also use promotion tools to promote posts they find important so that they hang at the top for a few days or show up bigger than other posts (highlight).

Admins can also give advertisers credits to spend judiciously on having an ad placed throughout the entirety of Facebook — or hanging at the top of everyone’s newsfeed in your network.

The reason it’s beneficial to moderate an advertiser is that generally, advertisers do other work too — not just social media advertisement. You don’t want them to have access to all of the information on the page because it could overwhelm them, and the most important information is available via Facebook Page insights so they are good to go.

This might allow an organization to potentially feel more comfortable in hiring a contractor, freelancer, etc. to help with a campaign and assigning them the role of advertise for their Facebook page. They don’t get to see everything — only what is pertinent to their role.

Advertisers can:

  • create ads, promotions and boosted posts;
  • view page insights and page quality;
  • see which users published as the page; and
  • publish and manage jobs.

What Facebook Page Analysts Can Do

The analyst is exclusively allowed to see the insights of an organization’s Facebook page. By gaining access to Facebook page metrics and social analytics, they can assess the page's current state and create content or advertising strategies based on those metrics to better match the results they're trying to achieve.

The analyst is really a "behind the scenes" type of role. They don't actively do or change anything with regards to the page's settings, content or audience. The only thing of use to them is the data behind the audience engagement.

Analysts can only:

  • view page insights and page quality;
  • see which users published as the page; and
  • publish and manage jobs.