Epson’s WorkForce WF-2660 All-in-One Printer

High quality, feature-rich, and exceptionally expensive to use

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Great output and strong mobile features with Epson's WorkForce WF-2660 All-in-One. Epson
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One of the things I hate about reviewing entry-level printers is that while they are often good little printers in their own rights, something about them—usually their operational costs—is wrong, or at least too high to make sense to all but small- and home-based businesses with very meager print and copy volume requirements. And that’s the (only serious) problem with the topic of this review, Epson’s $149.99 (MSRP) WorkForce WF-2660 All-in-One Printer; it costs a lot to use.

In other words, it prints very well and reasonably fast, and the scanner makes excellent scans and copies. But it’s daily operational cost of consumables (in this case, ink, of course) makes using it, compared to like-priced competitors, too expensive, to the point that if you print a lot, more than say a few hundred pages per month (and that might be pushing it), unless money is no object, this is probably not your printer.

Design and Features

Part of Epson’s recent remake of its home-based, small-, and medium-size business printers, the company’s PrecisionCore-based WorkForce and WorkForce Pro lines, the WF-2660 has a 1S PrecisionCore printhead, meaning that it has two PrecisionCore printhead print chips, as opposed to the 2S WorkForce Pro models, which have four chips, making them faster—and cheaper to use, too.

Aside from the sky-high per-page cost of ink, another genuine disappointment was that its automatic document feeder (ADF) couldn’t auto-duplex, or that it can't scan the second sides of a two-sided multipage documents without your having to turn the pages over and feed them back into the ADF manually.

If you scan a lot of two-sided documents, you will need this feature.

Like many competing models do these days, this one also doesn’t have the ability to print on pre-labeled CDs and DVDs, nor does it support scanning to and printing from memory cards (as most other WorkForce models do). Hence, this type of walk-up PC-free print, copy, and scan traffic is supported only via mobile devices with Wi-Fi Direct, Near-Field Communication (NFC), or direct connections to several popular cloud sites.

For a discussion of the latest mobile connectivity options, check out this About.com article.

Furthermore, at 16.7"x22.0"x9.1" (WxDxH), it does all these things without taking up much space on your desktop, and it weighs less than 15 pounds.

Performance, Paper Handling, Print Quality

Most Epson WorkForce printers are fast. In fact, much improved print speeds was one of PrecisionCore’s touted benefits. In most cases, such as the faster, higher-capacity WorkForce WF-3640, PrecisionCore printers are fast, but this isn’t one of them. It’s fast enough, but not very fast, compared to competitors, and especially compared to other WorkForce models. This is an entry-level, occasional-use machine, after all. It doesn’t need to be fast.

As for paper-handling, the WF-2660 has only one 150-sheet input tray that can handle paper sizes from the smallest snapshot up to legal (8.5”x14”), and it has an auto-duplexing print engine for churning out two-sided prints without user intervention. Printed pages land on the extendable output tray located directly above the input tray.

WorkForce models typically print nice-looking documents and better-than-passable photos. I got that and more from the WF-2660. It printed exceptional-looking documents and photos a bit above what I normally see from Epson’s business-class printers.

Cost Per Page

Frankly, aside from the company’s mobile printers, such as the WorkForce WF-100 Mobile Printer, I don’t recall seeing an Epson printer with a cost per page this high. Even when you use the highest yield cartridges, operational costs are far too high: 6 cents for black-and-white pages and 17.3 cents for color—too much by just about any $150-printer’s standards. Epson’s own ($199.99 MSRP with $80 instant rebate, for $119.99 at this writing) WF-3640 delivers CPPs of about 3.2 cents, and your color CPP would run about 11.3 cents.

If you print a lot, these are huge savings, and you don’t have to print that much before you start to realize them.

Bottom Line

I liked this printer. It did most everything small offices need from their MFP, and it did them well. But, again, if you plan to print more than a few hundred pages each month, choose another WorkForce model. As I wrote this, though, the WF-2660 was on sale for $50 off, or $99.99. That’s better, but it does not really help with the ink equation. Otherwise, this a great little printer.