What Is an EDS File?

How to Open, Edit, and Convert EDS Files

EDS Files
EDS Files.

A file with the EDS file extension is an Electronic Data Sheet file. This plain text format is based on the CANopen standard and used to specify various descriptive and communication data for hardware devices, usually those within industrial automation systems.

XDD files are an XML based format specified in the newest CANopen standard and will eventually replace EDS files.

The EditStudio video editing program uses EDS files too, for EditStudio Project files; as does the Ensoniq SQ10 sound synthesizer, as Ensoniq SQ80 Disk Image files.

Note: Electronic Data Sheet files are sometimes referred to as Rockwell Automation DeviceNet files or ControlNet files.

How to Open an EDS File

EDS files can be viewed, created, and tested with the CANeds program, which is included in the demo version of both CANoe.CANopen and CANalyzer.CANopen.

A free command line program, called CANchkEDS, is also available that can check the validity of an EDS file. CANchkEDS is included as part of the free CANeds tool.

Since Electronic Data Sheet files are just plain text files, you can even view them as text documents using any text editor, like Windows Notepad or one from our Best Free Text Editors list.

You can also add an EDS file to RSLinx for use with the Logix5000 controller family.

If your EDS file is associated with Mediachance's EditStudio software, then it can of course be opened with that application.

The only application I know of that should open Ensoniq SQ80 Disk Image files is called Ensoniq Disk Tools, but I can't find a valid download link. The Ensoniq company was founded in 1982 and was then purchased by Creative Technology Ltd. in 1998, after which they discontinued that division of the company and ended support for its products.

Note: Since there are multiple programs that can open an EDS file, one of them might be used when double-clicking or double-tapping the file, but it might not be the one you would like to have open the file. Fortunately, you can change which program opens EDS files. See our guide on How to Change the Default Program for a Specific File Extension to make that change in Windows.

How to Convert an EDS File

An EDS file that's saved in the Electronic Data Sheet file format can be opened with CANeds and then saved to the DCF, XDD, or XDC format, which, respectively, are the Device Configuration, CANopen Device Description, and CANopen Device Configuration formats.

Since the EditStudio application is a video editor, you can export your project to a movie format, but the EDS file itself is just used to store files related to the overall project, not to hold the video data you're working with. In other words, you can open a project (EDS file) in EditStudio, but you can't technically save the EDS file to any other format.

Note: Remember that an EDS file is different than an ESD file. If you're trying to convert an ESD file to WIM (Windows Imaging Format) or ISO, see What Is an ESD File?. Another similar abbreviation is EDT, which stands for Eastern Daylight Time - convert between time zones (EDT to EST, etc.) with TimeBie.

Still Can't Open Your File?

If you've tried the EDS file viewers from above, or even ran the EDS file through a converter tool and it still doesn't open, you might be misreading the file extension.

For example, even though the same file extension letters are used for ESD files, the two actually have nothing to do with each other (ESD files are Windows Electronic Software Download files). Some other examples of file formats that probably don't open in the same way as EDS files include EDI (Electronic Data Interchange), DES (Pro/DESKTOP CAD), EDB (Exchange Information Store Database), and EDF (Edificius Project).

However, if you're for sure that your file has the .EDS file extension, go ahead and open it with Notepad++ even if you don't think it's a text file. This will force the file to open as a text document. There might be some information within the text that can point you in the right direction regarding the file's format and the program that can open or edit it.