10 Best eBook Readers for Android

Read your favorite books on these great apps

Woman reading an ereader sitting in a large chair

Tim Robberts / Getty Images

There's some seriously good news for readers with an Android phone. It also doubles as an eBook reader. Even though phone screens have gotten larger, they're still not all that big. However, if you try out an eBook reading app, you may discover that your Android turns out to be a pretty good pocket reader, plus you can always read on a tablet if you find your phone too small. Plus, the apps from the biggest eBook stores all work on both phones and tablets and they'll allow you to pick up right where you left off on any device.

Want free books? You can download free eBooks for every one of these readers. Most books are classics now in the public domain, but you'll also find the occasional promo.

All of the apps below should be equally available no matter which company makes your Android phone, including Samsung, Google, Huawei, Xiaomi, etc.

01
of 10

Amazon Kindle Reader

Amazon Kindle Reader

What We Like

  • Absolutely gigantic library for sale

  • Great controls

  • Quickly buy and download

  • Exclusives and unlimited subscriptions

What We Don't Like

  • Proprietary format makes moving books difficult

Amazon.com's Kindle reader is a huge hit. One of the things that make it so popular, aside from access to a huge library of Kindle books on Amazon.com, is that Amazon.com offers an app for most mobile devices, including Android, iPhone, and laptops running Windows or Mac OS. The Kindle app also remembers where you left off from any Internet-connected device, so you can start reading on your iPod and finish on your Android.

The thing to keep in mind as you build an Amazon.com library is that Amazon's books are meant to stay in Kindle readers. They use a proprietary format rather than keeping with the industry-standard ePub format, and that locks you into only buying books from Amazon.com.

02
of 10

Google Play Books

Google Play Books

What We Like

  • Massive library for sale

  • Great Android integration(obviously)

  • Clean and simple interface

  • Easily manage, import, and transfer books

What We Don't Like

  • Not quite as refined as Kindle(small nitpick, really)

Google Play Books is a bookstore from Google. They have apps for Android, iPad, iPod, computers, and just about every smartphone or eBook reader available, except for the Amazon Kindle. The Google Play Books eBook reader offers similar features to most readers, including the ability to start reading on one connected device and continue on another. The bookstore itself features a large selection of eBooks and audiobooks in addition to free books from Google's large database of scanned public domain library books.

If you are reading DRM-free books that you purchased from another store, you can also transfer those books into your library on Google Play Books and read them there. 

03
of 10

Kobo Books

Rakuten Kobo Reader

What We Like

  • Tons of books available

  • Great interface and controls

  • Easy to sign in and manage

What We Don't Like

  • Store navigation feels clunky

Kobo Readers were the choice of Borders bookstores. Remember Borders? However, Kobo was always an independent store, so the Kobo Reader did not die when Borders did. The Kobo app can read ePub formatted books as well as Adobe Digital Editions, which means you can potentially use them to check out books from the library. While you can still get Kobo readers, the Android app makes for an excellent reading experience.

The Kobo store lets you download thousands of top-quality books and read them across your devices. You can also buy books outside the Kobo store, so long as they are DRM-free ePub books.

04
of 10

Aldiko

Aldiko

What We Like

  • Great simple interface

  • Not tied to a single format or platform

  • Easy access to public domain books

What We Don't Like

  • No bookstore

  • Books need to be imported manually

If you don't want an app tied to a major bookstore or platform, but you do want a full-featured reader capable of reading open ePub books, Aldiko is a solid and popular choice. It's easy to read, and very customizable. However, the Aldiko reader is a choice that involves more fiddling. Unlike the other readers mentioned here, it is not tied to a tablet, and it doesn't sync with a reader. You could run the Aldiko app on an open Android tablet, but your bookmarks will not transfer to your phone. There is also a way to sink your books with Calibre, but it involves rooting your phone. 

Aldiko also offers a wide range of free public domain books without any DRM. If you're looking to dive into classics, it's a great way to get started. Otherwise, you're going to need to purchase your eBooks elsewhere and import them.

05
of 10

Nook

Nook Reader

What We Like

  • Easy to navigate, buy, and read

  • Fantastic selection to buy

  • Great reader controls

What We Don't Like

  • Browsing in the store could be simplified

The Nook Reader is Barnes & Noble Books' eReader. They used to be specialized devices, but now, they're mostly Android tablets running the Nook app. So, installing the app on your Android device effectively gives you all the functionality of a Nook. Nook, like Kobo, supports ePub and Adobe Digital Editions. 

While Barnes & Noble isn't as big as Amazon or Google, it's still one of the largest traditional bookstores in the world. The app definitely reflects that and offers a ton of choice in addition to a well-polished interface for reading.

06
of 10

Moon+ Reader

Moon+ Reader

What We Like

  • Super simple interface

  • Import books easily

  • Download free public domain books

What We Don't Like

  • Not many customization options

Moon+ reader is another completely independent eBook reader. That means that it isn't tied to a single store or platform. Instead, you need to download your own books and import them.

That said, Moon+ is extremely simple to use and get started. It doesn't take much to import your books, and when you do, they're automatically placed on your virtual bookshelf. The reading controls are simple too, and they look good. It's a shame there's no easy way to customize them, though. Moon+ is a fantastic option for a simple indie e-reader.

07
of 10

Wattpad

Wattpad

What We Like

  • Easy to sign up and get started

  • Tons of stories to read

  • Great social aspects

  • Read new stories here first

What We Don't Like

  • You may have to "kiss a few frogs"

  • No mainstream published works

Wattpad is something entirely different. It's not a store like Amazon or Barnes & Noble. Instead, it's an indie publishing platform that lets you read the works of undiscovered and independent authors. Wattpad aims to make connections between undiscovered talent and major publishers, and it certainly has worked. Wattpad books have gone on to be adapted for film.

In addition to letting you browse and read indie books, you can actually write and publish your own. Wattpad is a social platform as much as an e-reader, and you can use it to connect with other readers and writers.

08
of 10

AlReader

AlReader

What We Like

  • Loads of customization options and controls

  • A real focus on reading

What We Don't Like

  • The interface isn't all that pretty

AlReader is a quick and dirty no-nonsense reader that puts you in your books right away. With AlReader, you get an independent eBook reader that focuses on the reading aspect more than the library, organization, or purchase of books.

AlReader has tons of control options for your books. You can truly tailor the reading experience to suit your preferences, no matter what they are. You can also import your eBook library fairly simply using the app's file browser. If you want to fine-tune your reading experience, this might be the best option for you.

09
of 10

Media365 Reader

Media365 Reader

What We Like

  • Excellent interface

  • Easily add and manage books

  • Simple reading controls

What We Don't Like

  • Out of place publishing feature/shop

Media365 Reader is one of the more polished indie e-reader apps available for Android. It features an extremely simple interface with great library controls and navigation. You can easily scan and import your eBooks and sort them to find what you want to read in a snap.

Media365 is kind of strange, though. It's also a publishing platform that lets indie authors, including you, publish their books for download through the app. It doesn't work that way in practice, though, and the built-in shop is reserved mostly for public domain classics.

10
of 10

ReadEra

ReadEra

What We Like

  • Fantastic design

  • Powerful reading controls

  • Great library organization options

  • Free with no ads

What We Don't Like

  • Nothing. Everything this one does, it does well.

ReadEra is a more powerful independent eBook app. It builds both strong reader controls that allow you to customize everything from your fonts to page color and margins and a visually appealing, easy to navigate, library.

ReadEra doesn't include on half-baked features or try to push some other agenda. Instead, it focuses on the actual features of an e-reader, organizing and reading books. Because it keeps things on track, everything ReadEra does, it does beautifully.