The 5 Best Video Editors for Chromebooks

Chromebooks can do more than just browse the web

Video editing timeline on computer screen.

Artal85/Getty Images

Chromebooks are great for browsing the web, working with Google Docs, and even for doing some quick photo editing. But, did you know you can also use your Chromebook to cut videos? Thanks to some powerful web-based tools and Android apps, you can create your own videos, complete with music, transitions, and more.

Here some of the best video editing software for Chromebook.

01
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WeVideo

WeVideo timeline.

What We Like

  • A feature rich service that's comparable to traditional desktop editing programs.

  • Includes stock video, photos, and music.

  • Offers collaborative editing.

What We Don't Like

  • Free tier includes watermarks on videos.

  • Lowest priced tier is restricted to 720p HD.

WeVideo is easily the most feature-rich cloud video editing service out there, and if you’ve used a non-linear editor before, you’ll be immediately comfortable with how it all works. 

Based around a standard timeline with support for multiple video and audio tracks, WeVideo also includes various transitions, titles, and more.

Adding content is as simple as dragging and dropping clips, photos, and audio directly from your computer, and it also offers direct syncing from cloud services like Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive. WeVideo also offers a library of stock music, sound effects, photos, and video clips, making it even easier to give your videos a professional polish.

The service also supports exports up to 4K, with the ability to also publish directly to YouTube and other video platforms.

All-in-all, WeVideo is a professional video editor that just happens to be cloud-based. If you want to get the most out of WeVideo, you’ll have to sign up for a subscription plan. There is a free tier, but exported videos are limited to standard definition and feature a prominent watermark.

02
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PowerDirector

PowerDirector editing timeline.

What We Like

  • Feature-rich.

  • Includes advanced tools

What We Don't Like

  • Only available on Chromebooks that support Android apps.

  • Not all features are free.

The Chromebook’s ability to run Android apps means there are even more options for video editing tools out there, and PowerDirector is undoubtedly one of the best.

Based around a familiar timeline, PowerDirector is a feature-rich app that offers many of the editing tools you’d expect. Additionally, PowerDirector also includes more advanced features like chroma key, retiming, video stabilization, voiceover recording, and more. Videos are also easy to export, and the app supports multiple resolutions including 4K.

PowerDirector is free, but some of the more advanced features require in-app purchases.

03
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Magisto

Magisto editing style picker.

What We Like

  • Easy to use.

  • Multiple customizable templates.

  • Simple to share completed videos.

What We Don't Like

  • No free plan.

Magisto is an excellent service for those that are a strapped for time or just a little less confident with video editing tools. 

Based on a template system, Magisto allows you to upload your photos, clips, and music, then automatically stitch them together to create a professional video with transitions and more.

The workflow is simple to follow, and there are multiple video styles available that are easy to preview. Additionally, if you require more content to make your video shine, you can choose from a broad selection of stock clips (powered by iStock) and a deep library of royalty-free music. Magisto also supports multiple aspect ratios, company branding, and more.

When you’re done, videos can be shared directly to YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook, as well as embedded on other websites.

Unfortunately Magisto is not free, but you can sample the Professional plan for seven days.

04
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KineMaster

KineMaster timeline editor.

What We Like

  • Clean and simple layout.

  • Feature-rich.

  • Free option.

What We Don't Like

  • Only available on Chromebooks that support Android apps.

  • Requires a subscription to access all features.

KineMaster is another Android-based video editing app that works great on Chromebooks.

Utilizing a multi-track layout, KineMaster’s timeline is simple to follow, and it provides easy access to core features, making it easy to import footage, record a voiceover, and more. It also offers advanced tools like retiming, keyframing, and chroma key, and supports video exports up to 4K.

Lastly, there's Asset Store, a repository for stock music, clips, sound effects, and images. With this, you should also have plenty of media at your disposal.

KineMaster is free to use, but you’ll have to purchase a subscription if you want access to all its features. Unfortunately, free videos are also watermarked.

05
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YouTube Editor

YouTube Editor timeline.

What We Like

  • Simple layout.

  • Includes features for blurring faces and logos.

  • Completely free.

What We Don't Like

  • Very basic.

  • You have to upload videos to YouTube first.

Though not strictly a standalone editing tool, YouTube Editor (part of YouTube Studio) is a great service for making simple edits to videos you’ve already uploaded to the platform.

To launch the app, you must first locate the video you want to edit, then select the Editor. Once open, you’ll see a familiar looking timeline with a few tools for trimming and cutting your footage, as well as an option to blur faces and logos. There’s also an option to add end cards specifically designed for YouTube playback. 

Exporting is simple enough with the option to save as a new video or replace the previous version; from your uploads library you can also elect to download your finished videos.

While YouTube Editor is thin on features, more functionality is expected to be added in the future.