The 10 Best TV Antennas of 2020

Cut cords with cable and still get reception with these top antennas

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products; you can learn more about our review process here. We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

The Rundown

Best Overall: Winegard FlatWave Amped FL5500A at Amazon

"This signal snatcher latches onto any window or wall in your home to receive HD signals."

Best Budget: AmazonBasics Ultra-Thin Antenna at Amazon

"If you have little to spend and you’re not worried about future-proofing, consider what AmazonBasics is offering."

Best Long Range: ClearStream 2V at Amazon

"Recognizes signals from up to 60 miles out, including crisp 1080p and 4K broadcasts."

Runner-Up, Best Long Range: 1byone Digital Amplified at Amazon

"This model adheres itself to a wall or window inside your home."

Best for HD TV: Mohu Blade at Amazon

"This company consistently produces quality home antennas, and the Mohu Blade is no different."

Best for 4K TV: Mohu ReLeaf at Amazon

"For the environmentally conscious community, Mohu has the only antenna you need to consider."

Runner-Up, Best for 4K TV: Winegard FL5500A FlatWave Amped at Amazon

"If you’re gearing up for a 4K upgrade in your home theater, Winegard’s FL5500A FlatWave antenna should be on your radar."

Best Omnidirectional: Antop AT-127 at Lowe’s

"The 4K-ready ANTOP AT-127 is just half a millimeter thin."

Best for Rural Areas: Mohu Leaf 30 at Amazon

"The Mohu Leaf 30 is a popular choice for many cord-cutting converts."

Best for Suburbs: Clearstream ECLIPSE at Amazon

"Offers your choice of black or white, and it’s paintable, giving you the flexibility to keep your Feng Shui intact."

Our Top Picks

Best Overall: Winegard FlatWave Amped FL5500A

Winegard FlatWave Amped FL5500A
Courtesy of Amazon.com
4.4

What We Like

  • 50-mile range

  • 4K-ready

  • USB-powered

What We Don't Like

  • Cables a little bulky

Though there are plenty of affordable internet TV options after you’ve boldly cut the cord, it’s still worth covering your bases with a digital TV antenna. Most people should be perfectly happy with Winegard’s FlatWave FL5500A. This signal snatcher latches onto any window or wall in your home to receive HD signals from all your local stations. The 18.5-foot coaxial cable and 3-foot USB power cable give you enough length to find the most effective position, and you can always use extension cables if you need more.

This dual-band antenna can pick up channels in both the VHF and UHF spectrum, giving you access to all available broadcasts within 50 miles. That range should be satisfactory for anyone living fairly close to hot pockets of civilization. The Winegard FlatWave FL5500A has a low-noise digital amplifier that helps minimize wireless interference to allow the purest 1080p signal possible to grace your screen. It’s also ATSC 3.0-compliant, which means it’ll be able to handle 4K Ultra HD broadcasts, which some major networks are looking to roll out starting in 2020.

Best Budget: AmazonBasics Ultra-Thin Antenna

What We Like

  • Super cheap

  • Dual colors

  • Requires only one cable

What We Don't Like

  • Lacks digital amplifier

If you have little to spend and you’re not worried about future-proofing, consider what AmazonBasics is offering. For just $20, you’re getting a flat digital antenna that’s wall- or window-mountable. It works like most other basic antennas, with a 10-foot coaxial cable (it's a passive antenna, so there's no external power needed) in place to feed whatever signals it can pick up directly to your TV. Those signals will top out at 1080p HD, and you won’t be able to take advantage of 4K broadcasts as it lacks ATSC 3.0 support, but this antenna can be a great starter product for someone who’s just getting their feet wet. 

With a maximum range of 35 miles, no digital amplifier, and many external factors influencing real-world performance, your success with this antenna isn’t guaranteed, but Amazon’s painless return policy of 30 days gives you enough time to experiment. The AmazonBasics antenna is also dual band, which means it supports both VHF and UHF signals, important if you want to ensure you’re seeing the most channels possible. Strangely enough, our favorite thing about this model is its chameleonic ability to fit in any home decor setting, as you’ll have your choice between black and white just by flipping it over.

Best Long Range: ClearStream 2V

What We Like

  • Impressive 60-mile range

  • Versatile mount

  • Weatherproof

What We Don't Like

  • Ugly in the home

Whether you’re on the outstretches of local signals or your area just has too much obstruction for quality reception, sometimes the cheaper, simpler antennas just won’t do. You’ll want a high-range model in those cases, and we can’t think of any better than the ClearStream 2V. It recognizes signals from up to 60 miles out, including crisp 1080p and 4K broadcasts across both UHF and VHF bands.

You could easily place the ClearStream V2 in your home, but it’s designed and works best for outdoor use. The antenna comes with a weatherproof mounting base that allows you to attach it to the side of your home. Though there’s no rotating mechanism on the mount itself, you can hook the antenna up to a motorized rotor sold separately for easy adjustments without having to get your hands too dirty. 

The only clear drawback of the ClearStream 2V is the lack of coaxial cable in the box, especially considering its relatively expensive price tag, but those are cheap enough that it shouldn’t deter you from purchasing one. That’s probably for the better as it’s impossible for the manufacturer to predict how much cable you’ll need for your specific needs.

Runner-Up, Best Long Range: 1byone Digital Amplified

4

What We Like

  • Very affordable

  • High-quality materials

  • Generous range

What We Don't Like

  • Troublesome in crowded areas

If you want extended-range but don’t have the extended funds to spring for a powerful antenna, 1byone’s latest amplified model might do the trick. With a considerably cheaper price tag, it offers over 50 miles of range, which is usually enough to pick up all the local stations with high definition clarity. This model adheres itself to a wall or window inside your home, and an included triple-shielded 16.5-foot coaxial cable makes for worry-free placement no matter where your TV is.

Overall, the value here is incredible. Like most newer antennas, the 1byone antenna parses signals across both UHF and VHF ranges and has all the hardware it needs to support forthcoming 4K broadcasts thanks to ATSC 3.0 compliance. The unit also supposedly has a premium amplifier, complete with noise-busting insulation and radio filters to keep smartphones and other competing wireless signals from knocking your picture out. Best of all, the company offers a generous 90-day return period and two years of warranty support, so you’ll have plenty of time to decide whether it’s right for you.

Best for HD TV: Mohu Blade

What We Like

  • Sleek design

  • High range

  • Versatile placement

What We Don't Like

  • Can't double as a soundbar

Mohu is a name you’re familiar with if you're serious about antennas. This company consistently produces quality home antennas, and the Mohu Blade is no different. Functionally, it’s not reinventing the wheel. It’ll get you up to 60 miles of range with support for both UHF and VHF bands, and it’ll be ready for the 2020’s 4K uprising. Mohu includes a 10-foot coaxial cable, though it’s detachable, so you’re free to buy a longer one if you need.

Although it doesn’t boast attenuation supremacy under-the-hood, the Mohu Blade’s claim to glory lies in the form factor that inspired its namesake. For starters, Mohu designed this thing more like a soundbar than the mousepad impersonators we usually get in this style. The antenna looks sleek and neat sitting on a wall, perhaps beneath or above the TV. Even better, Mohu tossed in a built-in kickstand for table-top placement, and you can even mount the thing outside. We love the look and versatility, and we love even more that you won’t have to reach deep into your piggy bank to own one.

Best for 4K TV: Mohu ReLeaf

What We Like

  • Ready for 4K

  • Sourced from reused plastic

  •  Double-sided

What We Don't Like

  • Lacks amplification

  • Meager range

For the environmentally-conscious community, Mohu has the only antenna you need to consider — the ReLeaf. Mohu manufactures this product using recycled material. You’ll get a kick out of learning that the vast majority of plastic in use comes from old cable set-top boxes, ones which would otherwise suffocate landfills with today’s cord-cutting revolution in full swing. This reversible antenna has different colors on each side, and it’s paintable, so a little DIY work can make it feel like just another cog in your home theater machine.

As for performance, the Mohu ReLeaf can read signals from towers up to 30 miles away. Unfortunately, it lacks a digital amplifier, which means the overall quality of your broadcasts may fall shy of picture-perfect. But that also means you only need a single coaxial cable to get up and running with HD broadcasts on any TV with a tuner. You’ll also be able to ride the 4K wave once ATSC 3.0 arrives thanks to its future-proofed hardware.

Runner-Up, Best for 4K TV: Winegard FL5500A FlatWave Amped

What We Like

  • 4K-compliant

  • High range

  • USB-powered

What We Don't Like

  • Cables can be messy

If you’re gearing up for a 4K upgrade in your home theater, Winegard’s FL5500A FlatWave antenna should be on your radar. This is a well-balanced antenna that boasts a 50-mile range, which many reviewers have found to be an accurate claim by the manufacturers. You’ll be able to pull down HD channels from the UHF and VHF bands, and because it has ATSC 3.0 hardware, it’s ready to go for 4K broadcasts from the likes of Fox and NBC, among others who have committed to 2020 rollouts.

The Winegard FL5500A is an amplified antenna, meaning it requires external power. The upshot is that you’ll get a purer signal with less interference from outside factors like smartphones or a strangely high concentration of microwave ovens near your TV. It couldn’t be simpler to install with the included mini coax cable and USB power. All you need to do is find an empty wall or window to throw it on, plug it in, and run a scan on your TV for all your local channels.

Best Omnidirectional: Antop AT-127

ANTOP Indoor Omni-directional Antenna

 Courtesy of Lowe's
https://www.lowes.com/pd/ANTOP-Indoor-Omni-directional-Antenna/1000503257

What We Like

  • Classy design

  • Versatile mounting options

  • 4K-compliant

What We Don't Like

  • Lacks digital amp

ANTOP’s omnidirectional antenna turns heads for a bucket full of reasons, but the first thing you’ll notice compared to its competitors is the unique wood-like finish. This is a classy antenna for sure. One side is a dark walnut, while the other will give you a light oak to find the perfect fit within a home filled with wood. The versatility in this antenna shows up in more ways than one, with your option to stick it on a wall, stand it up using the included stand, or let it lie flat on any surface in your home.

The 4K-ready ANTOP AT-127 is just half a millimeter thin, and there’s decent power in that petiteness with an advertised 40-mile range that should be enough to cover most urban areas. An amp would have been nice to filter out picture-degrading interference and noise that can occur, but the lone 10-foot coaxial cable provided in the box contributes to easy installation and a cleaner look.

Best for Rural Areas: Mohu Leaf 30

What We Like

  •  Reversible design

  • 4K-capable

  • Affordable

What We Don't Like

  • No amplifier

As the entry-level option in Mohu’s highly revered line of digital antennas, the Mohu Leaf 30 is a popular choice for many cord-cutting converts. The 30 in its name is a head nod to Mohu’s advertised 30-mile range, though the dual-band radio inside can technically reach up to 40 miles. Mohu prides itself on using high quality materials, so even though you may find antennas with better advertised range in the same price bracket, you’ll have added peace of mind knowing you’re getting the best product for your money. It helps that Mohu has a proven customer service track record, plus there’s a one-year warranty if you run into any issues.

The Mohu Leaf 30 is 4K-ready, and with reversible sides, you’ll be able to choose between white and black to ensure it doesn’t clash with the style of your home. Setup is swift with just a single 10-foot coaxial cable. That means there’s no digital amplifier, but if you’re in a rural area within reach of broadcast antennas — with minimal wireless interference and fewer building obstructions — there may be no need for one.

Best for Suburbs: Clearstream ECLIPSE

What We Like

  • Smart design

  • Extended range

  • Includes inline amp

What We Don't Like

  • No alternative mount option

There’s little elegance to behold in the world of digital antennas. Most attach to your wall looking like an oversized bandaid. If you need something more stylish for your beautiful suburban home, the Clearstream ECLIPSE might be the ticket. This circular, double-sided antenna offers your choice of black or white, and it’s paintable, giving you the flexibility to keep your Feng Shui intact. 

According to ClearStream, its round form factor helps with more than aesthetics, with the company claiming its patented loop design improves reliability and reception with no adjustments. The Clearstream ECLIPSE ships with a 15-foot coaxial cable and an in-line digital amplifier with USB power in the box, allowing you to get the best HD signal out of its 50-mile range without pixelation or fuzziness. Like most newer antennas, you’re also ready for ATSC 3.0, so don’t hesitate to pick one up if you’re planning on a big 4K upgrade down the line.

Tested by

How We Tested

We bought two of our readers’ favorite TV antennas that our reviewers tested for 115 hours. We asked our testers to consider the most important features when using these antennas, from their range to their cost. We’ve outlined the key takeaways here so that you, too, know what to look for when shopping.

What to Look for in a TV Antenna

Range - To get the most channels, look for an antenna that can pick up signals from towers broadcasting far away. A typical range is about 25 to 50 miles, though some can reach up to 60 miles.

Budget - TV antennas can cost you $100+, but if you’re on a budget, there are plenty of good low-cost options. And to be honest, some even rival the more expensive options when it comes to range and usability.

Outdoor vs. indoor - If you live in an urban area near TV broadcast towers, you’ll be all set with an indoor antenna. However, if you live in a more rural area, you should consider an outdoor antenna, which are mounted on a rooftop and often have better range.

Test Results: Winegard FlatWave Amped FL5500A (Runner-Up, Best for 4K TV)

4.4

What We Like

  • Very easy and fast setup

  • Budget-friendly

  • Good range

What We Don't Like

  • Some stations come in clearer than others

  • Can’t be completely flat on wall because of attached cord

If you’re looking to switch from cable, the Winegard FlatWave Amped FL5500A is the best indoor antenna option out there, according to our testers. One reviewer, who used to pay $35 a month for DirecTV Now, said, “I think it's a great option if you’re a cord cutter that enjoys watching live TV and the news.”

The entire installation process is quick and easy. Our testers appreciated the fact that you don’t need tools or special equipment and, overall, the picture comes in clear and sharp. One reviewer did note that “the picture quality on some channels can be better than others,” but she added, “It's expected. It's free TV!”

Test Results: 1byone 50-Mile Amplified HDTV Antenna (Runner-Up, Best Long Range)

4

What We Like

  • Thin

  • Good reception

  • Great value

What We Don't Like

  • Has to be moved for different stations

If you’re looking for an inexpensive way to cut your cable and still watch live TV, our testers found this antenna to be a great purchase. In addition to the affordable price, our testers liked that the antenna is small and thin, making it easy to hide. On the flip side, the signal isn’t perfect, according to our reviewers. “You get what you pay for, and by that I mean on stormy days, the signal suffers slightly, and you sometimes have to move the antenna around your room for different stations,” warned one of our testers. The overall takeaway: “If you don't want to pay an exorbitant monthly fee for cable, this product is definitely worth it,” one of our reviewers declared.