The 7 Best Razer Mice of 2021

The best Razer mice for the most serious players

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The Rundown
"The V2 pro retains the same tried and true form factor that popularized the DeathAdder way back in 2006."
"Razer is taking gaming mouse technology to new highs with the latest generation of the fan favorite Viper."
"The Basilisk Essential is one of Razer's most popular mice, and it is an excellent option for anyone looking to upgrade or buy their first gaming-specific mouse."
"he Razer DeathAdder V2 boasts best-in-class ergonomics with a design that fits your hand more naturally to reduce hand, wrist, and forearm fatigue."
Best for MMOs/MOBAs:
Razer Naga Trinity at Amazon
"The real magic lies in its three unconnected side plates, which you can use to quickly adjust the button configuration."
Best Portable:
Razer Atheris at Amazon
"The Razer Atheris features a compact design that is not only comfortable, but can easily be placed in a laptop bag or backpack for travel to a LAN party or tournament."
"t retails for around $40, making it a more reasonable investment for a first-time mouse or for anyone looking for a basic gaming model."
"This model uses Razer's new Hyperspeed wireless technology for a faster, more reliable connection than Bluetooth or 2.4GHz dongles alone."

While they've certainly branched out since their founding in 2005, incorporating everything from gaming chairs to facemasks into their lineup, Razer's bread and butter have always been their gaming mice. They didn't announce any revolutionary new mice at CES this year, but Razer is still sure to show us some fun new additions to their lineup in the coming months. 

The best Razer mice include both wired and wireless options like the Viper and the Basilisk Ultimate. While the company has a reputation for being on the more expensive side, it does offer more budget-friendly models like the Basilisk Essential at Amazon and Viper Mini at Amazon for gamers looking for a basic, dependable mouse. 

The Razer Synapse and Chroma apps allow for custom button layouts and input configurations on compatible mice as well as personalized RGB lighting to show off your squad loyalties or personal tastes. Razer has begun to introduce cutting-edge technology like optical switches for faster input responses and their proprietary Hyperspeed wireless technology for ultra-low-latency connections and more reliable gaming.

Best Overall: Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro

What We Like
  • Razer's best sensor yet

  • Ergonomic and comfortable

  • PTFE feet offer super smooth motion

What We Don't Like
  • Pricing is a bit steep

  • Right-handed only

The most recent addition to the Razer mouse lineup is a bit of a blast from the past. The Deathadder V2 Pro is a refresh of one of Razer's most popular mice. The V2 pro retains the same tried and true form factor that popularized the DeathAdder way back in 2006 but adds wireless connectivity, a new 20K DPI optical sensor, improved switches alongside a smattering of other upgrades to make this the best iteration of the DeathAdder to date.

The V2 Pro offers wireless connectivity via Bluetooth or 2.4 GHz wireless using a dongle that can be conveniently stashed within the body of the mouse itself. The mouse offers up to 120 hours of battery life provided you keep the chroma RGB lighting disabled, and can be recharged with either the included cable or by using the Razer Chroma mouse dock that started appearing with their wireless versions of the Basilisk and Viper last year.

The DeathAdder V2 Pro is arguably the best mouse from Razer to date, and while it does carry a bit of a hefty price tag, it's difficult to find many downsides to this excellent peripheral, unless you happen to be left-handed.

Best Sensor: Razer Viper 8K

What We Like
  •  Ambidextrous design

  • Optical switches

  • Same price as the older model

What We Don't Like
  • New tech may not be necessary for all users

Razer is taking gaming mouse technology to new highs with the latest generation of the fan favorite Viper. This version keeps much of what made the original viper so popular, it retains the same ambidextrous, lightweight design with 2 additional buttons on both sides of the mouse and an entirely symmetrical layout. What makes this version of the Viper different is the addition of a new sensor that tops out at 20K DPI, but also a vastly improved polling rate, enabling the mouse to communicate with your desktop up to 8,000 times every second.

Polling rate is a measurement of how often your device communicates its inputs with your computer, and the vast majority of gaming mice have topped out at 1000Hz, meaning that it speaks with your computer 1,000 times each second. But with monitors now reaching in excess of 240Hz and new graphics cards using latency reducing technology, gaming is stressing the upper limit of what is actually noticeable by the human eye.

While these improvements have questionable utility to all but the top one percent of gamers, they do represent an attempt to innovate in a space that has largely become stale. Also, the new and improved version costs the same as the older version did at launch which shows an eagerness on the part of Razer for people to try out this technology for themselves.   

Most Popular: Razer Basilisk Essential

What We Like
  • Multi-function thumb paddle

  • 7 programmable buttons

  • Ergonomic design

What We Don't Like
  • Low DPI max

  • Right-handed only

  • No on-board memory

The Basilisk Essential is one of Razer's most popular mice, and it is an excellent option for anyone looking to upgrade or buy their first gaming-specific mouse. It features seven programmable buttons so you can customize inputs for your most-played games. The optical sensor has a native 6,400 DPI for greater accuracy when it counts. The thumb paddle can be programmed for multiple functions, including push-to-talk during the in-game chat, a DPI throttle for precision aiming, or a press-and-hold function for reloading or using healing items. 

Each button uses a mechanical switch rated for up to 20 million clicks, giving you solid dependability during the life of the mouse. The ergonomic design is meant to more naturally fit your hand for more comfortable use during marathon gaming sessions. You can use the Razer Chroma and Synapse apps to customize the RGB lighting and easily switch between layout and DPI profiles.

Best Ergonomic: Razer DeathAdder v2 Gaming Mouse

Razer DeathAdder v2 Gaming Mouse
What We Like
  • 20,000 max DPI

  • Optical switches

  • Best in class ergonomics

What We Don't Like
  • Right handed only

  • No tilt-click scroll wheel

Whether it's for work or play, comfort is one of the most important factors to consider when shopping for a new mouse. The Razer DeathAdder V2 boasts best-in-class ergonomics with a design that fits your hand more naturally to reduce hand, wrist, and forearm fatigue. The braided cable and lightweight body are designed to reduce drag for quick movements and to further prevent fatigue. The top of the mouse has dual switches for adjusting DPI on-the-fly so you don't have to tab out of your game and mess with special apps or settings. 

With 8 programmable buttons and enough on-board memory for 5 different profiles, you can quickly change from Photoshop to playing your favorite games on your lunch break and then back to work. The optical sensor has a 20,000 max DPI for ultimate precision in digital art or down to the wire gaming. Each button uses Razer's new optical switches for ultra-fast input responses, and with a lifetime rating of 70 million clicks, you won't have to worry about the DeathAdder V2 giving up the ghost in the middle of a ranked match. 

Best for MMOs/MOBAs: Razer Naga Trinity

What We Like
  • Versatile, swappable side panel

  • Improved sensor

What We Don't Like
  • Button layouts aren't super intuitive

Serious MMO and RTS gamers are a more sophisticated breed, demanding that their mouse meet the criteria of often complex gaming titles. The Razer Naga line has always been designed specifically for this genre, but the Naga Trinity takes this commitment to another level entirely, embracing a variety of RTS, MMO, and even MOBA gaming needs and gracing your desk with three different mice for the price of one.

Like most MMO gaming mice, the Naga Trinity has a lot of buttons, but the real magic lies in its three unconnected side plates, which you can use to quickly adjust the button configuration for your preferred gaming style. A standard 12-button array is designed for traditional MMOs, a MOBA array lays out seven buttons in a circular pattern around your thumb, and a traditional two-button panel is in place so the Naga can shed its kitschy aesthetics in favor of something a little more pared down.

Otherwise, the Naga Trinity is still, evidently, a member of the Naga family. Its bulky chassis, which is wider and touts a higher profile than most competing gaming mice, marks its return to form. But its primo features — RGB lighting, a DPI ceiling of 16,000, and fast and precise tracking, to name a few — are in line with those of Razer's other, similarly priced gaming mice.

Best Portable: Razer Atheris

What We Like
  • Ambidextrous

  • 350 hours use

  • Wireless or Bluetooth Connectivity

What We Don't Like
  • Not Rechargeable

Gamers on-the-go need a mouse that is not only portable but ready to take on almost any game the squad wants to play. The Razer Atheris features a compact design that is not only comfortable but can easily be placed in a laptop bag or backpack for travel to a LAN party or tournament. The Atheris is also ambidextrous so both right and left-handed users can be comfortable. It's powered by two AA batteries and can give you up to 350 hours of use before needing fresh ones, letting you game for hours each day, worry-free. 

You can connect it to your laptop with either the 2.4GHz USB dongle or Bluetooth connectivity for truly wireless gaming. With 5 programmable buttons and adjustable DPI settings, you can create custom button layouts for your most frequently played games and switch between them on-the-fly. Each button is built with a mechanical switch rated for 50 million clicks for sure-fire input responses and durability. 

Best Budget: Razer Viper Mini

What We Like
  • Ambidextrous

  • Optical switches

  • Affordable

What We Don't Like
  • Can store only one button profile at a time

Razer has a reputation for being a pricey brand, so budget-conscious gamers will be happy to learn the Razer Viper Mini is a more affordable option. It retails for around $40, making it a more reasonable investment for a first-time mouse or for anyone looking for a basic gaming model. Left-handed gamers will also love the ambidextrous design. With 6 programmable buttons and adjustable DPI, you can configure the Viper Mini to almost any game on-the-fly. 

Each button uses an optical sensor for input response times as little as .2 milliseconds, giving you the extra edge you'll need to win intense competitive matches. The body of the mouse weighs just 61 grams and features ultra-smooth plastic feet designed to reduce drag for faster, more comfortable movements. The woven cable is also designed to reduce drag and prevent annoying hang-ups at key moments. 

Best Splurge: Razer Basilisk Ultimate

What We Like
  • Quick charge

  • Custom Scroll resistance

  • Long battery life

What We Don't Like
  • Right handed only

If you're willing to pay more in order to have the best of the best when it comes to gaming mice, the Razer Basilisk Ultimate is the only choice. This model uses Razer's new Hyperspeed wireless technology for a faster, more reliable connection than Bluetooth or 2.4GHz dongles alone. Each of the 11 programmable buttons is built with an optical sensor for lighting-fast input responses, and with a lifetime rating of up to 70 million clicks, you won't have to worry about durability. The left side of the mouse features two thumb buttons as well as a multi-function paddle that can be programmed for push-to-talk chat in-game or as a DPI throttle for precision aiming. 

The top of the mouse has recessed DPI switches for adjusting the max 20,000 DPI sensor speed on-the-fly without the fear of accidental button presses in the heat of the moment. The bottom of the mouse features ultra-smooth feet for faster, more comfortable movements and a scroll wheel resistance adjuster for more customization. The integrated battery gives you up to 100 hours of use on a single charge, and just 10 minutes of charge time gives you 5 hours of use so you can top up your mouse before important tournaments or friendly matches with friends. It comes packaged with a charging dock for storage when not in use as well as a detachable USB cable so you can game or work while charging the mouse. 

The Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro is the best, most well-rounded mouse the company has to offer. With a max 20,000 DPI and 7 programmable buttons, you can customize input layouts and movement responses for different games and programs. The ambidextrous design is comfortable for both right and left-handed users. The Basilisk Essential is an excellent entry-level mouse for budget-conscious gamers. It has a multi-function thumb paddle that allows for DPI throttling and precision aiming as well as push-to-talk for an in-game chat or press-and-hold functions for in-game items or spells. 

About Our Trusted Experts

Taylor Clemons has over three years of experience writing about games and consumer technology. She has written for Lifewire, Digital Trends, TechRadar, and her own publication, Steam Shovelers.

Alice Newcome-Beill has been the associate commerce editor for Lifewire since December 2019. Her work has appeared on PCMag, PC Gamer, and GamesRadar. In her spare time, she enjoys building computers, emulating old software in DOSBox, and cycling.

FAQ

Should I get a wired or wireless gaming mouse?
Wireless gaming mice were considered for the longest time to offer inferior performance to their wired counterparts. Thankfully that's no longer the case with wireless mice having equal or better performance than wired mice. Wireless mice can sometimes be slightly heavier but eliminate the sometimes annoying cable drag that trips up some players. But of course, there is the additional consideration of remembering to recharge your mouse at regular intervals.


What is a gaming mouse?
The biggest feature that sets gaming mice apart from their more conventional counterparts is the optical sensor. Your more typical, run of the mill mouse tops out at about 4,000 DPI, the latest gaming mice have sensors that can reach up to 20,000 DPI. While it's doubtful you'll ever be using a sensitivity this high, having this option does give you some flexibility depending on the types of games you play.

Gaming mice usually also feature some form of RGB lighting, allowing you to personalize your peripherals to compliment the rest of your gaming setup.   


I'm a lefty, can I use a gaming mouse?
Unfortunately, the vast majority of gaming mice aren't catered to the southpaw crowd, but there are a number of options that are ambidextrous like the Razer Viper that allow you to cater your inputs for left-handed use.

What to look for in the Best Razer Mice

Wired or Wireless: This feature is largely dependent on how much money you have to spend. Mouse tech has advanced to the point where the performance gap between wired and wireless mice is largely unnoticeable. While wireless mice tend to be more convenient, they are considerably more expensive.

DPI: The DPI (or CPI depending on who you're asking) determines the overall sensitivity cap of the mouse you're using. While some mice can reach up to 20,000 DPI, you likely won't be going much higher than 2,400 without a practiced hand so don't necessarily use this as a metric for one mouse being better than another.

Buttons: The number and placement of the buttons can be big deal depending on the types of games you play. Having a massive bank of extra buttons for macros can occasionally be helpful. But perhaps the biggest reason to pay attention to button layout is to determine if the mouse will be comfortable if you're right or left-handed.

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