The Best of the 2011 CEDIA EXPO

01
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Introduction to the 2011 Edition of the CEDIA EXPO

Photo of the Official CEDIA EXPO 2011 Logo
Official CEDIA EXPO 2011 Logo. Logo (c) CEDIA (Custom Electronic Design and Installation Association)

The annual CEDIA EXPO once again featured new and upcoming home theater and home automation products, as well as providing training and certification for home theater professionals, during its four-day run at the Indiana Convention Convention Center.

Despite continued economic doldrums, exhibitors and attendees were upbeat. Attendance this year was approximately 17,600 - of which 25% were first-time attendees. Total attendance was less than in recent years, but there were 83 new exhibitors, as well as a large number of new product introductions. On the other hand, some high-profile manufacturers did not have booths this year, including LG, Toshiba, and D&M Holdings (which includes Denon, Marantz, Boston Acoustics, and McIntosh).

One topic of conversation at the show was how the skyrocketing price of neodymium is affecting the ability of loudspeaker companies to hold down prices. Neodymium is a rare-earth metal used in the construction of speaker magnets (mostly high-end).

It turns out that China controls most of the world's available supply of neodymium, similar to how South Africa has significant control of diamonds and OPEC controls the majority of oil. For additional perspective on the neodymium issue, refer to the report posted by Consumer Electronics Daily.

Needless to say, speaker manufacturers that use a lot of neodymium and already charge a premium price for their products are watching carefully how this will affect their bottom line going forward, especially if prices continue to go up and mining of new sources of the rare earth metal do not pan out.

Moving onto a more positive note, several technology advances were on display.

One technology advance that had both the press and attendees buzzing was the introduction of video projectors from both Sony and JVC that sport 4K video resolution (that is 4 times the resolution of 1080p).

Also, new 3D products were in abundance, including an increased number of 3D-capable video projectors using both DLP and LCD-based technology, as well as add-on 2D-to-3D conversion devices.

In addition, and perhaps a more significant element in the evolution of home theater, is the increased availability and use of downloadable home theater and home automation remote control apps for iPhones, iPads, and Android phones, as well as the increased incorporation of web browser-type onscreen menu systems for devices, such as home theater receivers, DVRs, and media servers.

One interesting technology also being demonstrated this year's CEDIA EXPO was wireless power transmission. Although not ready for the prime time just yet, it was fun to see water boil and a blender in use without the need to physically plug the pot or the blender into a power source. It will definitely be some time before this technology can be applied to heavy power needs of home theater and home automation systems, if ever, but just the possibility of safe wireless power transmission for any use is fascinating.

For a further look at what CEDIA 2011 was all about, continue on through the following step-by-step photo-illustrated report...

02
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Sony VPL-VW1000ES and JVC DLA-RS65 4K Video Projectors

Sony VPL-VW1000ES and JVC DLA-RS65 4K Video Projectors on Display at CEDIA 2011
Sony VPL-VW1000ES and JVC DLA-RS65 4K Video Projectors on Display at CEDIA 2011 - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

One of the big things at CEDIA 2011 was the introduction by both Sony and JVC of home theater video projectors that can display a 4K resolution image. However, Sony and JVC have taken different approaches to accomplish this task.

Based on the same technology used in its 4K commercial cinema projectors, the Sony VPL-VW1000ES (shown on the left side of the above photo) utilizes three native 4K resolution SXRD chips, impressive 2000 ANSI lumens output, and built-in 3D (including 2D to 3D conversion). The expected price is to come in about $25,000.

In a similar move, JVC has also announced a line of 4K video projectors (the DLA-RS65 is shown on the right in the above photo). However, their approach utilizes a function called "e-shift" to project a 4k image onto the screen.

The benefit of e-shift is that the projection of an approximate-4K quality image can be obtained at less cost. The way this works is that JVC projectors actually have the same number of pixels as a 1080p projector (1920x1080), but light moves through the lens and D-ila chips, using a refraction process that shifts 1 or 2 pixels vertically and horizontally, thus creating an effective 4K resolution image.

However, 3D cannot be projected using the e-shift mode. In other words, while the Sony projector can display a 4K image in either 2D or 3D, the JVC projector can display a 2D image in 4K, but 3D has to be displayed in 2K (approx 1080p).

Of course, there isn't any original 4K content or 4K input source components available for consumers at this point, so the fact that the JVC approach doesn't accept 4K input sources is really not an issue at this point. On the other hand, JVC representatives have indicated that when 4K source content and devices do become available, they will be compatible with its e-shift technology.

When the time comes, whether the current crop of e-shift projectors can be updated, or if users will have to purchase a new projector in order to gain 4K input capability remains to be seen. The price of JVC's e-shift 4K projectors will be coming in at less than $12,000. 

03
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Epson Home Cinema 3010/3010e and 5010/5010e 3D LCD Video Projectors

Epson Home Cinema 3010/3010e and 5010/5010e 3D LCD Video Projectors at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Epson Home Cinema 3010/3010e and 5010/5010e 3D LCD Video Projectors at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

Although 4K generated the big buzz with regards to video projection at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO, there was plenty of other great video projector product announcements to take note of.

Epson was on hand with the new additions to its popular video projector line-up. Two projectors that caught my eye were the Home Cinema 3010/3010e and 5010/5010e, which employ 3LCD technology.

Both projectors have 1080p native resolution and are 2D and 3D capable. 3010/3010e and 5010/5010e also have the ability, when using 2D mode, to project two side-by-side images from separate sources at the same time.

Some of the features in the 3010 package include Maximum 2,200 lumens light output, 40,000:1 contrast ratio, inclusion of 10-watt per channel stereo amplifier with built-in speakers, and 2 pairs of active shutter 3D glasses. The 3010 package is priced at $1,599.99.

The 3010e package includes the same 3010 projector, but trades out the 3D glasses for a wirelessHD connection option. As a result, with the 3010e, the 3D glasses are an optional purchase. The 3010e package is priced at $1,799.99.

Some of the features are the 5010 package include Maximum 2400 lumens light output, 200,000:1 contrast ratio, and built-in 2D-to-3D conversion. On the other hand, the 5010 does not have built-in speakers and 3D glasses require and additional purchase. The 5010 package is expected to be priced slightly under $3,000.

The 5010e is the same as the 5010  but adds the wirelessHD connection option. The 5010 package is expected to be priced slightly under $3,500.

04
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Vivitek H1086-3D and Mitsubishi HC-7800D 3D DLP Video Projectors

Vivitek H1086-3D and Mitsubishi HC-7800D 3D DLP Video Projectors at CEDIA 2011
Vivitek H1086-3D and Mitsubishi HC-7800D 3D DLP Video Projectors at CEDIA 2011 - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

In addition to the LCD-based video projectors on display at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO, there were also a number of projectors on display utilizing DLP technology. Two affordable examples were the Vivitek H1086-3D (shown on the left) and Mitsubishi HC-7800D (shown on the right).

First up, the Vivitek H1086-3D features 1080p native resolution, 2,000 lumens light output, 5,000:1 contrast ratio (full on/full off), and both Native 3D and built-in 2D-to-3D conversion. Also included is a built-in 5-watt amplifier with mono speaker in case an external audio system is not available. The H1086-3D also utilizes the DLP-Link active shutter 3D glasses system (3D glasses require optional purchase). Suggested price is $1,999.

The next entry is the Mitsubishi HC-7800D. This projector also features both native 3D and 2D-to-3D conversion display, along with 1080p native resolution, 1,600 lumens output, 30,000:1 on/off contrast ratio, and up to 5,000 hours of lamp life in low mode (when viewing 3D - bright mode should be enabled). The 7800D also provides high-speed frame rate conversion for reducing crosstalk and motion blur when viewing in 3D mode. According to Mitsubishi, they are using their own proprietary active shutter glasses system. The suggested price for the HC-7800D is $3,495.

05
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Sharp Elite PRO-Z5FD Series LCD TVs

Photo of the Sharp Elite PRO-Z5FD Series LCD TVs as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the Sharp Elite PRO-Z5FD Series LCD TVs as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

In an interesting twist at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO, Sharp joined in on the Pioneer booth, which primarily featured Pioneer's extensive audio and Blu-ray player line-up, but a room in the booth was devoted to Sharp's new Elite TVs. Previously, I reported on the official announcement that Sharp's Elite TVs were now available. However, I had questions about Sharp's performance claims.

Now having to opportunity to see these sets in operation at the Pioneer booth, I can say that I was impressed with the image quality, based on the demonstration content material. The color was accurate, the detail was exceptional, but the black levels is where these sets prove their mettle. Using a combination of Sharp full array LED backlighing with local dimming, 240Hz effect scanning backlight, and 4 color RGB+Y technology with Pioneer-based video processing, I feel that Sharp has come very close to the performance standards set by Pioneer's previous KURO Plasma TV line, and definitely better than any other LCD TVs currently on the market. This is definitely a significant advance as Sharp's Elite TVs finally brings LCD black level performance in line with the best plasma TVs, which has been a struggle for LCD TV makers.

In addition, these sets are both 2D and 3D enabled and come with the two pairs of active shutter 3D glasses. Sharp's 3D glasses can be used in either 3D or 3D mode. This is very practical in cases where one member of the family wants to watch TV in 3D and the other prefers watching in 2D. Both can watch the same program in 2D and 3D at the same time, provided the 2D viewer is also wearing the Sharp 3D glasses.

However, it remains to be seen if consumers will dig deeper into their pockets for the extra cash to pay for these sets. The 60-inch PRO-60X5FD has a suggested price of 5,999.99, while the 70-inch PRO-70X5FD has a suggested price of $8,499.99.

It will be interesting to see how successful the Sharp/Pioneer partnership will be over the course of this next year.

06
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3D Now Processor

Photo of the 3D Now Processor as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the 3D Now Processor as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

Here is an interesting take on 3D I saw at CEDIA this year. Although several TV makers and other manufacturers were promoting the ability to convert 2D-to-3D on the fly, a company called 3D Now was promoting their outboard 3D processor which allows the viewing of native content 3D on any 2D HDTV in 3D equipped with an HDMI input.

Here is how it works:

1. Connect 3D capable Blu-ray Disc player, Cable, or Satellite Box to the 3D Now Processor shown in above photo using an HDMI connection.

2. Connect the HDMI output of the 3D Now box to an HDMI input on your HDTV or video projector.

3. Cue up a Blu-ray Disc or access 3D content from your cable/satellite box.

4. Put on the provided 3D Now Active Shutter 3D glasses and start watching.

3D Now works on TVs with any native resolution - However, to view 3D in full 1080p, you need a 1080p TV. The actual results will depend on your own TVs resolution and other performance characteristics.

OK, so the question is: Does it work? In a word "Yes". However, there were two demonstrations running at the booth and the demo that was using a flat panel TV was having some technical issues, which appeared not be directly related to the 3D Now device. On the other hand, the demo running the 3D now processor with a video projector worked just fine.

It is important to note that the 3D Now processor does not convert 2D to 3D, you must have access to 3D-enabled source components and content. However, since this product allows you to use your current HDMI-equipped 2D HDTV to view 3D, you don't have to spend money on a new 3D TV, especially if you purchased your current TV recently or just a few years ago.

I expect to get the chance to review an actually 3D Now unit once it gets closer to its Quarter One 2012 release date, so stay tuned. This is one product I am definitely looking forward to reviewing.

In the meantime, check out the 3D Now Website for information available so far.

07
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Atlantic Technology PowerBar 235 with H-PAS Technology

Photo of the Atlantic Technology PowerBar 235 with H-PAS technology as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the Atlantic Technology PowerBar 235 with H-PAS technology as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

In 2009, Atlantic Technology demonstrated a breakthrough loudspeaker technology that produced exceptional bass without the need for a subwoofer. Dubbed H-PAS (Hybrid Pressure Acceleration System), this technology uses the manipulation of internal cabinet design to amplify low frequencies. As result, speakers with drivers as small as 4 1/2-inches can push enough air through the speaker cabinet's internal chambers to produce very low frequencies.

I was on hand in 2009 at that first demonstration for the press and was really impressed the prototype speaker that was used. The question that immediately popped into my mind at the time, was "Can you do it in a Sound Bar?". The answer at that time from Atlantic Technology President and CEO, Peter Tribeman was "maybe".

Well, it is two years later and it looks like my question was definitely answered. At this year's CEDIA, Peter and the Atlantic Technology crew were on-hand to demo their new H-PAS 235 Power Bar. The 235 is two channel 42-inch wide sound bar that houses just two 4 1/2 main drivers and two 1-inch tweeters, powered by a 40 watts x 2 channel amplifier.

However, using its H-PAS internal cabinet design, the 235 is able to deliver frequencies down to 47Hz at only -3db. In non-technical terms, this is a really strong bass output without a subwoofer. In addition, as frequencies get lower, the H-PAS design does not put any extra strain on the amplifier or the 4 1/2 inch drivers.

However, ​the bass wasn't the only story here. Vocals were clear and had lots of depth, and bolstered by virtual surround processing which adds either a three or five channel effect, movie soundtracks easily filled the sound room with widely dispersed sound. The 235 Power Bar is still going through some last minute tweaks and possible changes in its input connection arrangement, but it will be available soon at a targeted price point between $500 and $600.

08
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KEF Blade Loudspeakers

Photo of the KEF Blade Loudspeakers as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the KEF Blade Loudspeakers as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

One thing I look forward to at CEDIA is listening to great loudspeakers. It is refreshing to hear how good music and movies can really sound. Even on music recordings and movie soundtracks you have heard many times, listening on a really good set of loudspeakers enables you to hear things you never thought were there. Frankly, there were a lot of great sounding loudspeakers in both medium and high-end price ranges on exhibit at this year's CEDIA EXPO, but one speaker that was really interesting was the $30,000 a pair KEF Blade shown in the above photo.

The Blade actually made its U.S. debut at the 2010 CES as simply a technology proof-of-concept referred to as "Concept Blade" for speaker design and engineering. There was not necessarily the intent to release these speakers as an actual product. However, as a result of great response from both the press and others that had the opportunity to listen to the Blade in action, KEF made further refinements and now the there is an actual product that can be purchased.

As a testament to how good these speakers sound, while other manufacturers demonstrated their speakers in closed sound rooms, KEF actually had the guts to just put them out on the floor and let them do their thing. Even with a noisy convention floor, once the Blades are running they pierce right through the noise and still deliver great sound. In addition, the Blade generates no cabinet vibration - you can put your hand anywhere on the outside surface and feel nothing except the smooth cabinet texture.

I will probably never be able to afford a set a KEF Blades, and, frankly, neither will most consumers, but just getting a chance to listen to them was a good reminder that we haven't lost the art of fine loudspeaker design in an era where a growing number of consumers listen to music through iPod earphones and movies through home-theater-in-a-box systems.

For more details, check out a KEF promotional video that discusses the story and design of these high-end loudspeakers.

This year is also KEF's 50th anniversary.

09
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Velodyne WiConnect Wireless Powered Subwoofers

Photo of the Velodyne WiConnect Wireless Powered Subwoofers as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the Velodyne WiConnect Wireless Powered Subwoofers as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

I have maintained for some time that wireless technology is a perfect match for a powered subwoofer, and in recent years, several companies have included wireless subwoofers in their product line. Velodyne prominently featured their WiConnect-10 wireless subwoofer at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO, which is shown on the far left side in the above photo. The WiConnect-10 features a 10-inch downfiring driver, bolstered by a rear port, and features a 125-watt output (RMS). The WiConnect-10is priced at $399.

However, in addition to wireless subs, Velodyne also announced a separate compact wireless audio transmitter and receiver (the two small objects shown on the center shelf in the above photo) that can turn any powered subwoofer into a wireless subwoofer. The wireless transmitter/receiver kit is priced at $169.

For more info on the Velodyne's WiConnect subwoofers, check out the official WiConnect product page.

10
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Harman QuantumLogic 3D Audio Surround Technology Demonstration

Harman QuantumLogic 3D Audio Surround Technology Demo at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Harman QuantumLogic 3D Audio Surround Technology Demo at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

OK, all I have to show you on this page is a sign advertising a demonstration of something called "QuantumLogic". However, it is the story behind this sign that is important.

In the past couple of years, several new surround processing formats have introduced, including Dolby ProLogic IIz, Audyssey DSX, DTS Neo:X, and SRS Circle Cinema 3D Audio. Now Harman has jumped in with it new surround sound processing system, QuantumLogic.

Outwardly, the description is familiar, QuantumLogic can extract a 7.1, 9.1, or 12.1 channel listening experience from any mono, stereo, or multi-channel audio source content. However, it is details that are different.

The way QuantumLogic works is that specific algorithms dig into the original content and extract all the individual elements in the audio stream, including voices, instruments, and ambience information and using that information alone, is able to reassemble the audio elements into an immersive 7.1, 9.1, or 12.1 channel sound field. The three levels of QuantumLogic are 7.1 channel soundfield, a 9.1 channel soundfield that incorporates two height channels, and a 12.1 channel soundfied that incorporates four height channels.

As part of the demo, we were shown how the individual elements could be isolated and played separately. Using a vocal piece, we heard an isolated vocal track, then an isolated instrumental track, and then finally the isolated ambience track.

However, when all the elements are recombined using the QuantumLogic process, the listening experience is absolutely amazing. The best way I can describe the effect of QuantumLogic, based on the demonstration presented at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO, is that the process does not add any additional "fake" surround sound enhancements such as added reverb or other time delay effects, it just brings out the spatial elements that are already present in the original recording and projects the sound out into the room the way it would be heard if you were the original witness to the performance.

The only downside in using QuantumLogic that I was able to determine so far was that, yes, you do need a lot of speakers to take full advantage of what QuantumLogic can do. However, in the custom installation universe, adding more speakers is not so much a cost issue, but more of an aesthetic issue, which can be solved by using in-ceiling speakers for the height channels and even in-wall options for the rest of the speakers.

As you can imagine, for now, Harman will only be using QuantumLogic in very high-end components, such as its forthcoming $14,000 MP-20 preamplifier/surround processor, and in the audio system for the new Ferrai FF four-seat Grand Tourismo. However, this technology will probably show up other Harman products, or licensed out to others, in the future (at least I hope so!). This is definitely a story I will continue to follow.

11
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HDBaseT Cable Comparison

HDBaseT Demonstration 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Cat5e Cable vs Traditional Audio, Video, and Power Cables
HDBaseT Demonstration 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Cat5e Cable vs Traditional Audio, Video, and Power Cables - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

Are you frustrated will all the connections you have to make to set-up your home theater system? HDMI was supposed to solve this problem, but as both consumers and installers have found out, HDMI does have its quirks that can cause connection frustration.

However, it turns out that the standard Ethernet connection and Cat5e cables used to connect your home network can also be used to pass high-definition video, audio, data, and even power (up to 100 watts AC) between components.

As a result, a new consortium, the HTBaseT Alliance has been formed to develop and promote this alternative home theater connection system. The goal is to add direct HTBaseT connectivity to home theater components.

On display at the HTBaseT booth were a TV, video projector, home theater receiver, and several other components that were equipped with, which is essentially Ethernet ports specifically dedicated to HTBaseT connectivity. Shown in the above photo is a comparison of all the cables that we all currently use in setting up our home theater system compared to a single thin version of a Cat5e cable (the blue cable in the middle of the photo) used by the HTBaseT protocol.

From what I could see, this is a very practical approach to connectivity, and may eventually be the do-it-all connection standard a lot of us are looking for, but there may be two uphill battles: First, although components could be fitted with HTBaseT fairly easily, it will be years before all components that use other types of connections would be replaced so that only HTBaseT would be required. Second, cable manufacturers may put up some resistance, after all, the high-profit margin made from making, selling, and installing the current maze of cabling would disappear.

It will be interesting to see how HTBaseT progresses.

12
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KanexPro 4x1 HDMI Switcher with Built-n 2D-to-3D Converter

Photo of KanexPro 4x1 HDMI Switcher with Built-n 2D-to-3D Converter as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of KanexPro 4x1 HDMI Switcher with Built-n 2D-to-3D Converter as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

Besides all the high-profile components on display, such as video projectors, loudspeakers, home theater receivers, etc... There are many manufacturer booths displaying add-on devices such as power management systems, mounting devices, equipment storage racks, furniture, cables, adapters, and switches.

KanexPro makes a number adapter and switching products, but one that caught my eye was their CubeUP 4x1 HDMI switcher (shown in the above photo) that also includes a built-in 2D-to-3D converter. This product is useful if you want to expand the number of HDMI inputs on your 3D TV or 3D video projector, but would also like to add 2D-to-3D conversion.

On first viewing, I wasn't impressed with the 2D-to-3D conversion, but it does add additional depth when viewing non-3D content on a 3D TV that doesn't already offer built-in 2D-to-3D conversion.

Another connection product on display at the KanexPro booth (not shown here) was a wireless HDMI extender kit, based on the WHDI protocol, that had a range of 50 ft. Although there are ​an increasing number of companies offering wireless HDMI connection solutions, the KanexPro unit is the least expensive option I have seen so far with a $399 price tag.

13
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iSky Star Ceilings

Photo of iSky Star Ceilings as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of iSky Star Ceilings as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

Besides all the components and add-on gadgets you can get for your home theater system, decor is also an important factor many. After all, if you spend a lot of time in your home theater room, you want to be comfortable and look good.

This is where companies, such as iSky come in.

iSky is a company that specializes in the manufacturing of star ceilings and led ceiling lighting. The star ceiling product is made of up small sections of sound absorbent material with an array of fiber optic pinpoint lights that create effective star pattern for your ceiling. The use of LED lighting and fiber optic technology makes these ceiling sections very energy efficient while maintaining a very aesthetically pleasing atmosphere. The lights can be displayed steady, or can randomly flicker adding an additional effect your family and friends will love.

Shown in the photo above is iSky CEO Jeff Graham showing one of iSky's light panels at the 2001 CEDIA EXPO. For more info on iSky and their products, check out their Website.

14
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Runco D-113d 3D DLP Video Projector

Photo of the Runco D-113d 3D DLP Video Projector as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO
Photo of the Runco D-113d 3D DLP Video Projector as shown at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO - Click on photo for larger view. Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com

There was​ a lot to see at the 2011 CEDIA EXPO and what I included in this report was only a cross section of what I saw and experienced. Some of the products I didn't include here will be covered in upcoming articles, including products I arranged to review.

However, before I close out this year's report, I just wanted to share the most expensive product I saw at the show, the $200,000 Runco D-113d 3D DLP Video Projector, which is pictured above.

In Runco style, this is certainly no ordinary video projector. First off, it is a dual 3-chip, dual light-engine, dual-lens DLP projector. For 3D, one light engine provides the left eye information and the provides the right eye information. The D-113d can pour out over 11,000 lumens of light (via 4 mercury lamps), which is easily enough for a 420-inch screen. However, even though Sony and JVC really pushed 4K this year, the Runco D-113d still has a native 1080p resolution.

For 3D, the D-113d utilizes the Panavision 3D system, which requires the use of proprietary passive-style glasses but can used in combination with any screen design or fabric, while still allowing full 1080p 3D resolution. Each light engine of the D-113d uses spectral comb filters to project a slightly different color spectrum on the screen for each eye. The special Panavision glasses, which have lenses that match each color spectrum, receive the two screen-reflected images containing the two color spectrums. By combining the two color spectrums received by the left and right eyes through the glasses, a full 3D image can be processed by the brain. The result is no crosstalk (ghosting) or other 3D artifacts, with proper brightness and contrast retained.

Having the opportunity to view a demonstration of the Runco D-113d, it is impressive. The light output can be intense at times, and the 3D is excellent, but the way the glasses are constructed to block out light from entering from the sides, above, or the rear, they are a little physically uncomfortable.

Also, when you consider that lamp life is rated at only 2,000 hours and the projector uses four lamps, that is a large recurring cost over time. In addition, for those that Eco-concious, this is probably not the projector for you, as it can draw as much as 2,000 or more watts of power when in full operation.

Obviously, the Runco D-113d is way out of reach for all but the wealthiest among us, but it is real, and it is available. After all, expensive cutting-edge technology today eventually filters down the line to affordability as the years move forward.

This wraps up my perspective on the CEDIA EXPO. Stay tuned for additional reports on products displayed at the show as they reach dealer shelves and that I will be getting in for review in the coming weeks and months.

Also, if you missed my CEDIA 2011 pre-show product reports, check out:

DPI Native 2:35 Aspect Ratio Projector

Velodyne DS-10 Subwoofer

TIVO Premiere Elite DVR

Integra Intros High-end Receivers and A/V Processor