The 8 Best Home Weather Stations of 2021

Weather in your backyard!

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products; you can learn more about our review process here. We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

The Rundown
The Ambient weather station gives you 10 sensors in a small package.
This weather station gives you indoor and outdoor temperatures, humidity, and animated forecast icons.
If you want a 5-in-1 weather station that is wireless and still gives you meaningful data, check out the AcuRite 01528.
The outdoor sensor included in this pack is impressively rugged.
If you're looking for a nice, entry-level weather station, the AcuRite 00589 Pro Color gives you the temperature, humidity, and wind speed in an affordable package.
If you want a rock-solid performer and real-time weather data, this is the system for you.
Best Precision:
Logia LOWSC510WB at Amazon
The Logia 5-in-1 weather station gives you accurate weather data that is synced up to 450 feet to the base station.
The great thing about this system is that it looks great, and you don't have to hide it away.

The best weather stations will help you stay on top of what can be incredibly unpredictable. Keeping track of changing weather patterns can be valuable. Having the instruments to see those changes coming can be powerful. Whether you want to get in touch with your inner meteorologist, or you're just a data nerd who likes knowing what's going on around you, we have a weather station for you.

More importantly though, when you live in rural areas or own property in a storm-prone area, a weather station can give you a heads up when things are about to get bad. If you get a warning a few hours or a few minutes ahead of time, that can be the difference in property damage and lives. Some of these stations generate their own data with their own instruments. Others are displays that pull in the needed information from weather centers around the world. Whatever you need, our experts have a weather station for you.

Best Overall: Ambient Weather WS-2902

The Ambient Weather WS-2902Cis a great weather device.
What We Like
  • Wide range of features

  • Great value

  • Wi-Fi connectivity

What We Don't Like
  • Complicated setup

  • Build quality issues

The Ambient weather station gives you 10 sensors in a small package. On the outdoor sensor array, you get wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, outdoor temperature, outdoor humidity, solar radiation, and UV. Inside, you get indoor temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure.  All of this is displayed on a color-coded LCD display which our reviewer was not a huge fan of, saying it was hard to read from across the room. But when you have the viewing angle right, you can see all the information clearly and laid out in a sensical way. We'd just like to see a larger and clearer display. 

Or maybe that doesn't matter, because this weather station also hooks up to your Wi-Fi and can broadcast information to your computer, tablet, or smartphone. We love that kind of connectivity. It's even compatible with Alexa and Google Assistant.  The weather app can gather and record data and it can be output for analysis. The only downside to that is the complicated setup involved (a lot of assembly is required) and build quality. Andy was not a fan of the build and questioned its long-term durability.

But overall, this weather station gives you a ton of data, no matter where you are. It's a great value, which is why we gave it our top pick.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: Yes | Barometric Pressure: Yes

"A feature-rich weather station at an affordable price point, though it suffers from lower build quality." — Andy Zahn, Product Tester

Ambient Weather WS-2902A

Lifewire / Andy Zahn

Best Budget: La Crosse Technology C85845V3

La Crosse Technology C85845-1 Color Wireless Forecast Station
What We Like
  • Easy setup

  • Great price

What We Don't Like
  • Only basic weather measurements

Sometimes you just want to know basic weather information and for that, we have the La Crosse Technology C85845V3. Alphabet soup names aside, this weather station gives you indoor and outdoor temperatures, humidity, and animated forecast icons. It's very easy to set up. You just mount the outdoor temperature sensor anywhere within 300 feet of the weather station. Then inside, set up the LCD panel either plugged in with an adapter or with three AA batteries. Just like that, you're all set up. 

The clock has automatic atomic time correction, daylight saving time, alarms, temperature zone alerts, and more. It's very simplistic, but it's a little fancier than just having a thermometer by your door. The large LCD panel is clear, color-coded, and easy to read from across the room. The screen can also be wall-mounted or set on a tabletop with a built-in kickstand.

We like this weather station because of its simplicity and its ability to fit into a lot of use cases from a normal everyday thermometer to something you can actually plan your day around.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: No | Rainfall: No | Barometric Pressure: No

Best 5-in-1: AcuRite 01528 Wireless Weather Station

AcuRite Pro 5-in-1 Color Weather Station will accurately tell you the weather.
What We Like
  • Pinpoint accurace

  • Support for 12 to 24 hour forecasting

  • Minimal assembly required

What We Don't Like
  • Some connectivity issues

If you want a 5-in-1 weather station that is wireless and still gives you meaningful data, check out the AcuRite 01528.  This is a two-device system with a set of sensors that get mounted outside and connects wirelessly to the LED screen on the inside. This device measures indoor and outdoor temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, and rain. That's a good amount of data to allow you to make meaningful decisions about your day.  There's also a 12 to 24-hour forecasting function to give you an estimate as to what's coming up. 

The set of sensors gets mounted outside anywhere within 330 feet of the receiver on the inside.  This receiver has a color-coded screen on the inside.  This is different from others though in that the screen itself is color-coded, and the numbers are black like a normal LED display. That can make the screen easier to read from a distance. 

Some reviewers complained about the outdoor sensors giving out after two years or less. That gives us some pause, though our own experience showed no such issues. All the same, it's important to keep that in mind. We still think it's a good investment for the price.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: Yes | Barometric Pressure: No

Best for Farmers: Davis Instruments Vantage Vue 6250 Wireless Weather Station

The Davis Instruments weather station will tel lyou the weather.
What We Like
  • Great accuracy

  • Fantastic transmission range

  • Solid durable construction

What We Don't Like
  • No internet connectivity

  • Expensive

  • Display looks outdated

This is one of the more expensive sensor sets on this list, but it comes with quality and accuracy that you'll count on if you need to know real-time weather data. Like other kits, this has a sensor package that gets mounted outside that communicates wirelessly with a base unit on the inside. As our reviewer Jeremy noted, the base unit is a throwback, for sure. "From the black and brown plastic to the LCD with its bright orange backlight, the Vantage Vue console looks like a relic from the 1980s."

That being said, the base unit gets readings in seconds from the sensor package. This is about as close to real-time weather data that you'll get short of opening a window and sticking your head out. The sensor package is top quality and durable and communicates with the base over 300 feet away. The base does not connect to the internet out of the box, which is a bummer for sure.  You can buy extra hardware to sync data to the cloud, but that's not as ideal as whipping out your smartphone and seeing the data firsthand. But if you need top quality, real-time accuracy, this is the unit for you.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: Yes | Barometric Pressure: Yes

"A nearly professional grade weather station that doesn’t cost that much more than other hobbyist units." — Jeremey Laukkonen, Product Tester

Davis Instruments Vantage Vue 6250

Lifewire / Jeremy Laukkonen

Best 3-in-1: AcuRite 00589 Pro Color Weather Station

The AcuRite Notos 3-in1 Weather Station will tell you the weater.
What We Like
  • Great price

  • Easy wireless setup

What We Don't Like
  • Bad viewing angles

  • Missing some key metrics

If you're looking for a nice, entry-level weather station, the AcuRite 00589 Pro Color gives you the temperature, humidity, and wind speed in an affordable package. Our reviewer tested this against the David Vantage Vue (that's the one above this one in the list). While Jeremy found the humidity and barometric pressure to be a little low, the wind speed was spot on. More importantly, the AcuRite was low by the same amount every time, which still provides usable data.

This sensor package is missing wind speed and a rain gauge, so it won't give you as much data as other offerings, but it's also less expensive than those other weather stations. Overall, it's a good starter kit for weather hobbyists. It's easy to set up, being completely wireless. Just mount the sensors package, and set up the base station and you're ready to roll. The base station also comes with 12 to 24-hour forecasting so you can plan ahead.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: No | Barometric Pressure: Yes

"A great entry-level unit, but it’s missing key measurements like wind direction and rainfall." — Jeremy Laukkonen, Product Tester

AcuRite 00589 Pro Color Weather Station

Lifewire / Jeremy Laukkonen

Best Splurge: Davis Instruments 6153 Vantage Pro2

The Davis Instruments 6153 Vantage Pro2 will tell you the weather.
What We Like
  • Transmit data up to 1,000 feet

  • Extendable sensor support

  • Durable construction

What We Don't Like
  • Subscription to access data remotely

  • Archaic display/readout

  • Expensive

If you are looking for all of the latest weather data you can collect, and you have a lot of extra money laying around, the Davis Instruments 6153 Vantage is the real deal. Durable isn't the right word here, because Davis built its sensor package to stand up to weather extremes including heat, cold, and 200 mph winds. We did not test that last one, but we wouldn't be surprised. The sensor package can transmit data up to 1,000 feet away and features a solar-powered fan and radiation shield.

On the inside, the Davis weather display has the same 80's look and feel as the Vantage Vue above, without the orange backlighting. But it's not the prettiest to look at. What's more, you can subscribe to a monthly plan to transmit your data to the cloud and access it remotely. After spending as much as you need to spend, we're not fans of shelling out more for a subscription service. But if you want a rock-solid performer and real-time weather data, this is the system for you.

Display: LED | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: Yes | Barometric Pressure: Yes

Best Precision: Logia LOWSC510WB 5-in-1 Weather Station

Logia 5-in-1 weather system
What We Like
  • Easy Setup

  • Bright, clear display

  • Accurate readings

What We Don't Like
  • Unclear setup instructions

The Logia 5-in-1 weather station gives you accurate weather data that is synced up to 450 feet to the base station. The data is synced every 12 seconds for wind speed and wind direction, and every 24 seconds for temperature, humidity, and rainfall. The base station connects to your Wi-Fi for cloud transmission of data, allowing you to access it on your smartphone. Reviewers had trouble connecting to Wi-Fi due to some clarity issues in the instructions, so that's important to keep in mind.

But once it's connected to the internet, you can access your data through the free app. The display of the base station is bright and easy to read, though our reviewer noted it was too bright for a bedroom; keep it away from sleeping areas. But if you need really accurate and up-to-date weather data on an easy-to-read interface, this is one of the best sensor packages you can pick up, especially considering the relatively low price.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: Yes | Rainfall: Yes | Barometric Pressure: Yes

Best Design: Netatmo Weather Station

The Netatmo Weather station will tell you the weather.
What We Like
  • Great design

  • Accurate

  • Good software

  • Expandable

What We Don't Like
  • Limited instrumentation

  • Pricey for what it offers

  • Slow app refreshes

  • No display (relies on apps)

The trouble with weather stations is they all look like weather stations. The Netatmo weather station offers a modern sleek looking pair of stations (one for inside and one outside). These base stations collect accurate information like humidity, barometric pressure, and temperature, and add two other less common measurements like sound and CO2 inside to give you a look at how your life indoors is going. You can purchase rain guards and anemometers if you want to add additional gauges. That's nice, but it adds to the cost of an already pricey setup. 

The Netatmo weather station relies on a phone or desktop app to give you the information you're looking for, which is fine, but not ideal. One of the benefits of having a weather station is information at a glance. A lack of display means you have to take out your phone, or worse open up your laptop to get the data you're looking for.  That's fine for long-term analysis, but for real-time data, that's not awesome. Speaking of which, the app doesn't refresh nearly as often as we'd like, sometimes taking up to 10 minutes between refreshes.

The great thing about this system is that it looks great, and you don't have to hide it away. But it comes at the compromise of not being able to see the data you're looking for when you're looking for it.

Display: LCD | Humidity: Yes | Wind: No | Rainfall: No | Barometric Pressure: Yes

"As is the case with other home weather stations, the Netatmo Personal Weather Station requires a minimal, but somewhat tedious setup process." — Dallon Adams, Product Tester

Netatmo Weather Station

Lifewire / Dallon Adams

Final Verdict

Overall, we have to give our best overall pick to the Ambient Weather WS-2902. It has a complete sensor package and a nice readable indoor display that lets you get a ton of information quickly at a glance. There's also app connectivity for long-term analysis and it even works for Google Assistant and Alexa. Considering the value and feature-complete package, it doesn't get much better. 


If however, you need something even more hardcore, as in your livelihood depends on knowing exactly what's going on in the weather right now, the Davis Instruments 6153 Vantage Pro (View at Amazon) is our pick. It's the most expensive on the list, but with that comes a ton of data, rock-solid communications, and durable build quality. This weather station will give you accurate data until the day it dies, and that day will probably involve a hurricane because that's what it takes to kill this thing.


About Our Trusted Experts

Meredith Popolo is a Stockholm-based writer specializing in consumer technology designed to streamline users' lives, including home weather stations.

Andy Zahn is a writer specializing in tech. He's reviewed cameras, weather stations, noise-cancelling headphones, and more for Lifewire.

Jeremy Laukkonen is tech writer and the creator of a popular blog and video game startup. He is a consumer technology expert and reviewed some of the home weather stations on this list.

Dallon Adams is a Portland, Oregon-based tech writer who specializes in consumer technology. He reviewed the Netatmo Weather Station on our list.

FAQs

How difficult is installing a home weather station?

This depends. Some weather stations barely need any installation at all. However, more complicated stations like the Davis Instruments 6153 have a variety of instrumentation and masts that require a more substantial amount of setup. Furthermore, mast-based sensors may require that you have permission from a specific property before installation. 

Does your home weather station need access to Wi-Fi?

If you want to remotely access readouts from your weather station, you should ensure that it has a relatively clear and stable connection to your home network. This isn't always necessary. Some home weather sensors have built-in LCD panels that can provide up-to-date information without the need for internet connectivity.

Why should you have a weather station?

If you live in an area that's prone to hazardous weather conditions, such as hurricanes or tornadoes, home weather stations can provide you with advance warning far faster than a local weather forecast can, especially if you live in a more rural area. Beyond just providing a heads up against dangerous weather patterns, home weather stations can give you localized data on humidity and rainfall if you're an avid gardener.

For others, monitoring the weather is a fun hobby. Measuring rainfall and wind direction can be a fascinating look into your local meteorology. You can even contribute that data to a number of crowd-sourced weather services like Weather Underground.

Ambient Weather WS-2902 Weather Station

What to Look for in a Home Weather Station

Durability

Because your weather monitor is intended to measure all sorts of conditions, you’ll need an outdoor sensor that can stand up to even the snowiest storms. Look for one that has rugged features, like casing for protection from cyclic erosion or moisture. Also check on the warranty, as some companies will reimburse you if the product doesn’t live up to its promises.

Transmission Distance

Setup of your weather station can be crucial to its accuracy. Most importantly, it needs to sit within a certain distance of the display. Standard sensors usually work within 330 feet, but more premium models have a transmission distance of up to 1,000 feet away. It's important to keep transmission distance in mind when shopping for a weather station.

One other important consideration is that transmission distance is generally advertised in clear, line of sight conditions. If you get a weather station that can transmit 300 feet, you should plan to mount the outside sensors within a circle or roughly 200 feet. Also, bear in mind, some sensors should not be mounted in areas that receive direct sunlight, while still others require mounting in direct sulight.

Connectivity

In a standard setup, your outdoor sensor will connect to an indoor monitor that displays measurements. Some more advanced setups will also connect to your computer or mobile device, so you can view stats remotely. Still not impressed? Certain models are even integrated with Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, or Apple Homekit so you can ask your assistant for your local weather.

Davis Instruments Vantage Vue 6250

Lifewire / Jeremy Laukkonen

Was this page helpful?