Best Free Audio Tools for Splitting Up Large Files

Shredding letters
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Audio file splitters are useful when you want to split large audio files into smaller, more manageable pieces. If you want to make ringtones for your phone, for instance, then you can use an audio file splitter app to produce free ringtones from your existing music collection.

Another reason you might want to use an audio file splitter is for large podcasts or other types of digital recording where there is one large continuous audio block. These can be large, and ​splitting them into sections makes them easier to listen to. Audiobooks usually come with chapter divisions, but if you have an audiobook that is just one large file, then a splitter can be used to create separate chapters.​

To start chopping, dicing, and mashing your audio files, check out some of the best free MP3 splitters on the internet.

01
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WavePad Audio File Splitter

What We Like

  • Full featured

  • Works with multiple formats

  • Mobile option

What We Don't Like

  • Might be complicated to start

WavePad Audio File Splitter comes with a good set of features for splitting up audio files. It supports both lossy and lossless audio formats such as MP3, OGG, FLAC, and WAV.

Although the website names this tool as an audio splitter, it's actually more than this; the app's name is a bit confusing, too. However, it's free for home use with no time limits.

What makes this program so versatile is the number of ways it can split audio files. Its most impressive feature is the use of silence detection. This enables you to split a large audio file that contains multiple music tracks.

If you rip an audio CD to one large MP3 file, then this tool is a good option for creating individual tracks. You can then use an ID3 tag editor to add track identifying information—an essential step if you want to know what each song is called.

This software is available for Windows and MacOS computers, iOS devices and Android devices. This excellent free program is flexible and highly recommended.

02
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Mp3splt

What We Like

  • Works with multiple formats

  • Cross platform

  • Simplified interface

What We Don't Like

  • Somewhat outdated

Mp3splt is a great tool for precision audio dicing. It automatically detects split points and silent gaps, which is convenient for splitting up an album. File names and music tag information can be retrieved from an online database—the CDDB—automatically.

You can download this multiplatform tool for Windows, MacOS, and Linux, and it supports MP3, Ogg Vorbis, and FLAC file formats.

The user interface is relatively easy to use, but there is a learning curve. The software has a built-in audio player so you can play whole audio tracks or preview your MP3 slices. If you have a large recording, Mp3splt produces good results.

03
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FFmpeg

What We Like

  • Open source

  • Powerful and flexible

  • Cross platform

What We Don't Like

  • Command line only

  • Learning curve

FFmpeg might be the most unconventional entry on this list, but it's here because it's super effective. FFmpeg is an open source command line tool that handles all sorts of multimedia files, including MP3s. It serves as the back end for plenty of other applications, but it's fairly simple to use by itself.

With FFmpeg, you can use a simple command to cut out sections of a larger audio file. Specify the time you'd like to start your cut, the time you want it to stop, and the output file, and you're good to go. Because FFmpeg is a command line tool, you can get extremely precise with the palaces you want to break things up. It's also flexible enough to convert your files to a different format while cutting them, so you can take a huge WAV or FLAC and cut it down in to more manageable MP3s.

Linux users can find FFmpeg in their distribution repositories too.

04
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Audacity

What We Like

  • Open source

  • Cross platform

  • Loads of features

  • Great graphical interface

What We Don't Like

  • May be overwhelming to new users

Audacity is a powerful open source tool for all sorts of audio editing work, making it a great candidate for something simple, like cutting down a long MP3. Audacity is available across a wide range of platforms, it's actively developed, and it features a simple graphical interface that's not too hard to pick up.

With Audacity, you can edit your file as well as cutting it down. Audacity has the added benefit of working with a wide range of audio formats, offering you the option to convert file types or make duplicates in different formats.

Linux users can find Audacity in their distribution repositories too.

05
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AudioTrimmer

What We Like

  • Simple web-based solution

  • Works on mobile

  • Supports multiple formats

What We Don't Like

  • Not much control

  • Requires uploads which can be large

If you'd prefer not to install an entirely new program, you can always use a web-based option, like AudioTrimmer. With this one, you can upload your overly long MP3 file, and tell the site where you would like to cut it. AudioTrimmer will edit your file and give you the resulting cut down pieces. This one works on any platform, even mobile, and it's great for one-off situations where installing a new program would be excessive.