The 7 Best 'Selling Apps' of 2018

Find the right apps to sell your stuff

A woman using an iPhone to photograph a purse

Luca Sage/Getty Images 

Even the most minimal among us accumulate stuff, and we want to get rid of it quickly and easily. If we make a little money, that's a nice little bonus too. There are quite a few apps that let you browse, and add to, the virtual garage sale online, but which are the best, what do they need... and what parts of them might make you want to leave that app on the curb.

Before You Sell Your Stuff

These apps all have a fairly consistent structure. You'll need to take at least one clear photo of the item, write a short, detailed description, and give it a price. You should sit down and write these out in detail before you put anything online, anywhere, in order to make the process simpler.

You should also decide ahead of time how you want buyers to pay for their items and how you want to hand over the item. Some people leave items in a bag on their porch, others meet the buyer at a public place, and so on. Having all this firmly set will help you when selling.

Finally, be wary of scammers and opportunists. It's a common technique for online opportunists to aggressively underbid for items they know they can turn around for a profit. Some are just hagglers; others aren't above bullying people. If somebody seems odd, overly aggressive, or you just don't like their behavior, thank them for their time and move on to the next. And if somebody asks you to accept a money order, it's almost certainly a rip-off.

 

Letgo app home screen

Letgo is designed to, well, help you let go of stuff. The app aims squarely at efficiency; you snap a photo, fill in some basic data, choose whether or not to post on Facebook, and you're off.

What We Like

  • Letgo is probably the easiest of all the apps to use. For example, if you're giving something away, you can simply toggle the listing to “free.”
  • It'll automatically title some items for you when you snap a picture.
  • You only have to give the app your general location.

What We Don't Like

  • There's no payment integration in the app; you'll have to work out both how to pay and how the item will be picked up separately.
  • The in-app chat also feels a bit clunky, although it's serviceable enough.

Letgo for iOS

Letgo for Android

Offerup app main screen

OfferUp takes a step-by-step process, moving you through each item. It claims to be able to get an item up for sale for thirty seconds or less.

What We Like

  • The step-by-step structure is great for newbies.
  • The reputation feature is easily the most robust among these apps.

What We Don't Like

  • The reputation feature doesn't come with any enforcement, so flaky buyers are still a problem on the platform.
  • It wants your precise location through GPS on the app, so if you're concerned about your location data and where it goes, this may not be the app for you.

OfferUp for iOS

OfferUp for Android

5Miles app main screen

As you might expect from the name, 5miles only shows people items to buy or sell within five miles of their location, and it's designed for face-to-face sales and interaction. That it's a pun on smiles is, we assume, just good luck.

What We Like

  • This has the most options for getting your listing out there, with Facebook, Twitter, SMS and email options.
  • It lets you list more than just items: Services, garage sales, housing, and employment opportunities can also be posted.
  • It picks out secure places for buyers and sellers to meet.
  • Top sellers have "levels" that mark them as particularly trustworthy.

What We Don't Like

  • If you don't live in a relatively populated area, you're out of luck.
  • Not everybody may want to let some buyers know they live within five miles of the drop-off point.

5Miles for iOS

5Miles for Android

VarageSale main screen

VarageSale wants to be a bit less of a free-for-all. Both buyers and sellers need to be verified, but it's still completely free.

What We Like

  • It has, by far, the best search tools of any of the apps we've seen on here, which means your listing will stand out.
  • It's among the faster to upload an item, once you're verified.

What We Don't Like

  • It prefers to use Facebook to verify your identity and hinging the quality of the seller on Facebook's ability to pick out fake profiles may make some buyers and sellers leery.

VarageSale for iOS

VarageSale for Android

Shpock app main screen

Shpock wants to be the high-end of used items; only the really good stuff, in really good condition, need apply. And if you're wondering, it's not run by Star Trek fans: The app's name is short for a "shop in your pocket."

What We Like

  • The tone may be slightly snobby for some, but if you've got something really nice that you want to sell, it won't get buried under junk listings.
  • The app can tell sellers if you're close by, making purchases more likely.

What We Don't Like

  • The app uses ads for free users, and limits both the number of photos you can add and where you fall on the search rankings.
  • People who pay get higher placement, which might leave a bad taste in some mouths.

Shpock for iOS

Shpock for Android

Facebook Marketplace in a browser window

Facebook is many things, and one of those things is a very big yard sale, courtesy of Marketplace in the main Facebook app.

What We Like

  • If you're on Facebook regularly anyway, it's got the biggest audience of any of these apps.
  • It's tightly integrated to the site, so you won't miss a notification.

What We Don't Like

  • If you're leery about Facebook's data collection policies, or its inability to keep that data private, there's no way to keep data on what you sell, or who you sell to, out of Facebook's hands.
  • You also need a Facebook login, and what you sell will be tied to your name.

Facebook for iOS

Facebook for Android

Cplus app main screen

Yes, the internet's first classified ad site is still out there and still going strong, more than a decade later. And it even has an officially licensed app, called Cplus.

What We Like

  • Craigslist still has a big audience, and it's probably the most accepting, and customizable, of all the sites for selling your stuff.
  • It's local without being too specific, if you prefer to keep your location under wraps.
  • The official app is very clean and easy-to-use.

What We Don't Like

  • Craigslist has never been a site about the frills, and if you're new to selling your stuff online, it might be too intimidating.
  • It's still got problems with scammers and bullies, even after all these years, so it's best for veterans of selling online and professionals.

CPlus for iOS

CPlus for Android