The 6 Best AA and AAA Rechargeable Batteries of 2022

Make sure your gadgets never run out of juice

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If you have lots of battery-powered devices in your house, making the switch to rechargeable batteries can save you quite a bit of money.

Our experts think most people should just buy the Energizer AA rechargeable batteries, which are perfect for remotes and low power devices.

If this is your first time buying rechargeable batteries, don't forget you'll need a charger—be sure to check out our list of the best rechargeable battery chargers

Best Overall: Energizer Rechargeable AA Batteries (8-Pack)

Energizer Eight-Pack
Courtesy of Amazon.com
What We Like
  • 5-year average lifespan

  • Maintain charge for 12 months in storage

  • Made partially from recycled batteries

What We Don't Like
  • Runs down somewhat quickly between charges

This set of eight AA batteries from Energizer is a great household pack for keeping remotes, cameras, and kids’ toys up and running year-round. They’re also made from 4% recycled batteries, which makes them that much more environmentally friendly.

These batteries are pre-charged and ready to use right out of the package and can be recharged about 1,000 times in their lifecycle, potentially replacing hundreds of single-use batteries.

Energizer’s “Extended Life Composition” also promises up to five years of regular use before they need to be recycled. If you aren’t using them right away, they can maintain a charge for up to a year in storage. 

Each charge gives these batteries 5.5 to 8 hours of use. That’s quite a bit of time for devices that are used infrequently or draw a minimal amount of power, like TV remotes or flashlights. But if you want to use these in electronics that are on for longer stretches of time or use a lot of power, like a set of string lights or a video game controller, you may find you need to recharge these batteries pretty frequently. 

Size: AA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 2,000mAh | Recharge Cycles: 1,000 | Pre-charged: Yes

Best Amazon: AmazonBasics 12-Pack AAA Rechargeable Batteries

Amazon 16-Pack AAA
Courtesy of Amazon.com
What We Like
  • Good value

  • Charger included

  • 4-hour recharge time

What We Don't Like
  • Capacity diminishes with multiple recharges

Amazon offers its own rechargeable option under the AmazonBasics brand, and this 12-pack of AAA batteries makes our list based on sheer value. Not only do you get a dozen rechargeable batteries, you also get a USB-powered charger that’s compatible with both AA and AAA battery sizes. It makes this a great starter kit for anyone looking to buy rechargeable batteries for the first time.

These batteries can be recharged up to 1,000 times and maintain 80% of their capacity for two years when left in storage. The charger can also power up AmazonBasics-brand batteries in just four hours. As a safety measure, it protects against accidental overcharging and wrong-polarity charging.

Size: AAA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 800mAh | Recharge Cycles: 1,000 | Pre-charged: Yes

Best Long-Lasting: Panasonic 16-Pack Eneloop AA and AAA

Panasonic 16-Pack Eneloop AA and AAA
Courtesy of Amazon.com
What We Like
  • Up to 2,100 recharge cycles

  • Maintains charge for 10 years in storage

  • Works in cold weather

What We Don't Like
  • More expensive

  • No charger included

They’re a little pricier than the other options on this list, but Panasonic’s Eneloop brand AAA rechargeable batteries last the longest of any of them. These batteries can be recharged up to 2,100 times, which is about twice the lifespan of the average rechargeable battery, and can power up in about two hours.

They are pre-charged out of the package and are “low self discharge,” meaning they can maintain about 70% of their power for up to 10 years in storage. 

Unlike many other brands of rechargeable batteries, Eneloop AAA batteries work even in very cold temperatures as low as minus-4 F. This makes them a great option for outdoor electronics like lights, security cameras, or an emergency kit in your car.

Size: AAA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 800mAh | Recharge Cycles: 2,100 | Pre-charged: Yes

Best Budget: Energerizer AAA Recharger Power Plus (4 count)

Energizer EVENH12BP4 Recharge Power Plus AAA 700 mAh Rechargeable Batteries, Pre-Charged (Pack of 4)
Courtesy of Amazon.com
What We Like
  • Maintains charge for 12 months in storage

  • Made partially from recycled batteries

What We Don't Like
  • Shorter overall lifespan

This pack of Energizer AAA rechargeable batteries is a great budget option for powering household items. The Recharge Power Plus model is designed to last longer between charges than some of Energizer’s other rechargeable options, so it’s great for electronics that use a lot of power, like digital cameras or kids’ toys.

As an added bonus, these batteries are made from 4% recycled batteries and can hold their charge for about a year in storage. The main downside is that it doesn’t support quite as many recharges, maxing out at about 700 cycles.

Size: AAA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 800mAh | Recharge Cycles: 700 | Pre-charged: Yes

Best High Capacity: EBL AA and AAA

EBL AA and AAA
Courtesy of Amazon.com
What We Like
  • Higher capacity

  • Maintains 80% capacity for 3 years of use

What We Don't Like
  • Only pre-charged to 15% capacity

  • Longer charge time

EBL may not be the most recognizable brand name, but these rechargeable batteries are an Amazon favorite for a reason. While most AAA rechargeable batteries have an 800mAh capacity, these have a whopping 1,100mAh capacity, meaning they last longer between charges and are an ideal choice for electronics that draw a lot of power.

These batteries are also LSD, or “low self discharge,” so they retain that larger capacity for longer—after three years of regular use, they should still be able to charge to 80%. They’re good for up to 1,200 recharge cycles.

While these batteries are technically pre-charged and useable out of the pack, they’re charged only to 15% capacity and will need several hours on the charger before they’re at full power. Their larger capacity also means they typically take longer to charge than 800mAh AAA batteries.

Size: AAA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 1,100mAh | Recharge Cycles: 1,200 | Pre-charged: Yes, only 15%

Best for Toys: Bonai 16-pack AA

Bonai 16-pack AA

Amazon

What We Like
  • Higher capacity

  • Ideal for high-drain electronics

What We Don't Like
  • Slightly larger diameter may not fit all battery compartments

  • Only pre-charged to 15% capacity

Kids’ toys tend to be high-drain devices that can burn through batteries fairly quickly. If you’re tired of constantly throwing out dead batteries from their favorite electronics, these Bonai Rechargeable AA Batteries are a great alternative.

These are high-capacity, 2,300mAh batteries that last longer between charges and can be recharged up to 1,200 times.

They also maintain 80% of their charge when left in storage for three years. Some reviewers note these batteries have a slightly larger diameter than the average AA, which may mean they don’t fit in every battery compartment.

Size: AA | Type: NiMH (nickel metal hybrid) | Capacity: 2,300mAh | Recharge Cycles: 1,200 | Pre-charged: Yes

Final Verdict

Our favorite rechargeable batteries are the Energizer Recharge Universal (view at Amazon), a solid value with a five-year lifecycle that are made partially from recycled batteries. AmazonBasics Rechargeable Batteries (view at Amazon) are another good option and come with their own USB-powered charger.

FAQ
  • What's the difference between types of batteries?

    Typically, AA and AAA batteries come in one of two flavors: lithium or alkaline (though please don't lick your batteries). Lithium batteries are longer-lasting, less prone to leakage, and more expensive. Alkaline batteries are cheaper, more ubiquitous, but rarely rechargeable.

  • How long do rechargeable AA and AAA batteries last?

    The total lifespan of your batteries, as well as the duration of a single charge for rechargeable batteries, depends on a number of factors: the draw of the device they're inserted in, voltage, the total time they're in active use vs. downtime, environmental factors, and manufacturing process/component quality. Generally, lithium and eneloop batteries will last longer than their alkaline alternatives, both in terms of individual charge and total life span.

  • Can batteries explode?

    It's extremely rare that consumer AA or AAA batteries will explode. To avoid ruptures, be sure you're not inserting batteries in the wrong direction, especially for long periods of time, and store your batteries (or the devices they're living in) away from heat sources and in dry conditions (to avoid corrosion and deteriorating the case, as well as the battery cavity of the device itself)

What to Look for in a Rechargeable Battery

Long Life

The life of a rechargeable battery is defined by how many times you can charge it, use it, and charge it again before it no longer works. Look for rechargeable AA and AAA batteries that are rated for at least 500 recharge cycles, or up to 2,000 recharge cycles for higher-end batteries.

Charge Capacity

Rechargeable AA and AAA batteries are defined by charge capacity, which is given in mAH. If your devices use a lot of power, then high-charge capacity is essential. If you’re buying batteries for devices that require less power, like wall clocks and remote controls, a lower capacity is fine.

Low Self-Discharge

This refers to how much charge the batteries lose when they aren’t in use. This is extremely important if you want to keep a bunch of extra AA and AAA rechargeable batteries in your drawer and grab fresh ones when you need them instead of waiting for the charger.

About Our Trusted Experts

Emmeline Kaser is an experienced product researcher and reviewer in the field of consumer tech. She is a former editor for Lifewire’s product testing and recommendation round-ups.

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