Anti Sleep Pilot Drowsy Driving App Review

Anti Sleep Pilot
Anti Sleep Pilot app. ASP Technology

This app is no longer available at the App Store and, presumably, no longer being maintained or updated by its developer.

Anti Sleep Pilot is an app version of a device designed to keep drivers alert and tell them when to take breaks to prevent accidents. While the app has a worthy goal, it's got too many bugs and quirks, and too high a price, to merit a recommendation at this time.

The Good

  • Questionnaire adjusts fatigue level for each trip
  • Automatically calculated break recommendations
  • Tests alertness regularly

The Bad

  • Buggy
  • Expensive

Stay Awake For Safety's Sake

Anti Sleep Pilot uses your own reports of your fatigue, plus the iPhone's GPS, to gauge how tired you are, how often your alertness needs to be checked, and when you should take breaks. You can create individual profiles for each driver, which is a smart idea, and then answer a handful of questions about your recent rest and behavior so the app can assess your fatigue level. With that done, you're ready to start driving.

Based on your fatigue level, the app will occasionally pop up a button on the screen while you drive that you're asked to tap. The speed at which you tap the button helps the app gauge your fatigue level. Based on those tests and your initial fatigue level when you started driving, Anti Sleep Pilot will periodically recommend that you take a driving break.

The app also provides information about your trip, such as the distance, your average speed, and how many breaks you took.

Bugs Inside Your Windshield

While all of these features are useful and well thought out, the app simply has too many bugs to be an essential traveling companion.

It has two substantial shortcomings: it doesn't work properly when the phone is locked and other apps running at the same time can cause serious interference.

If you lock your phone after launching Anti Sleep Pilot, the app doesn't entirely continue to function. On a number of trips when I tried this, the app would pop up a message—like a text message notification when your screen is locked—telling me to activate the app.

Since the iPhone can only shown notifications on the lockscreen, Anti Sleep Pilot can't pop up the button to test driver fatigue when the phone is locked. While it was able to track my driving and when I should take a break, it never offered a tone or alert telling me to take a break when the phone was locked. So, the choice here is either to not use all features of the app or to leave your phone unlocked all the time, which will drain the battery. This choice makes the tracking of the recommended break less useful.

The makers of Anti Sleep Pilot also acknowledge that the app has problems with other apps running in the background. I found that to be true. Many people listen to music, make phone calls, or do other similar things while driving. Anti Sleep Pilot often doesn't work properly when these things are happening.

The app does have a music player interface built into it, but it only allows you to play music, not podcasts or audiobooks, which is a real shortcoming for those of us who use long drives to catch up on our listening. Even when you play the music, it will sometimes abruptly stop working, even though the app keeps running.

A number of times when I tried to play music or use another app and run Anti Sleep Pilot in the background, the app would freeze up and become completely unresponsive. I had to quit the app to get it to work again. The app's developers recommend you quit other background apps to make Anti Sleep Pilot run better, but that's a very reasonable workaround. Once during the testing, the app completely reset itself and my trip for no clear reason.

The Bottom Line

Anti Sleep Pilot is a great idea that could offer substantial benefits to anyone who does a lot of driving. Unfortunately, in its current state, it's just not ready for regular use. The bugs are too numerous. Combine that with a fairly high price for an app—if the app was flawless, it might still seem a little high, but it would be worth it—and it's not an app I can recommend until improvements are made.

What You'll Need

An iPhone 3GS or higher or iPad 3G, running iOS 4.1 or higher

Disclosure: A review copy was provided by the publisher.